The Congress needs a new vision to recapture old glory | india | Hindustan Times
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The Congress needs a new vision to recapture old glory

Pankaj Vohra in The Congress is going off track (Between Us, January 4) is right in arguing that the 125-year-old party has become directionless in its ideology and non-decisive as far as policy innovations are concerned.

india Updated: Jan 05, 2010 22:05 IST

The Congress needs a new vision to recapture old glory
Pankaj Vohra in The Congress is going off track (Between Us, January 4) is right in arguing that the 125-year-old party has become directionless in its ideology and non-decisive as far as policy innovations are concerned. The party won the 2009 elections by default, and now contentious issues like the division of states, price-rise, insurgency, judicial reforms, foreign policy, etc. are being assigned to a handful of ministers alone, as if the opinions of others in the party don't matter. It’s time the party re-sensitised itself towards the issues that matter to the people who voted it in.
Dev Gulati, via email

Steer clear of Australia
The report Indian stabbed to death in Oz (January 4) was distressing. It is a shame that despite mounting attacks on Indians in Australia, that country’s prime minister has repeatedly failed to live up to his assurances. It is beyond comprehension why Indians alone are being targeted Down Under. Perhaps it’s time our students boycotted racist Australia in favour of other, better, destinations like Britain and the US for higher studies. The government should push the Australian authorities to ensure that those responsible for taking an innocent life are brought to book. And this time we should not be satisfied with empty pledges alone.
Gururajan Ramachandran, Ooty

Making the right choice
Ramachandra Guha in The fitness test (History Matters, January 4) is right in his observation that only a credible track record, rather than political loyalties or affiliation, should be the criteria for appointment to the crucial post of governor. Given the controversies surrounding governors, like those of Bihar and Andhra Pradesh in recent times, there is an urgent need for constitutional safeguards to check the influence of political patronage over their functioning, especially to insulate this high office from a regime change at the Centre.
Lalit Ambardar, Delhi