The danger is spreading | india | Hindustan Times
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The danger is spreading

I fully endorse the sense of foreboding expressed in Lalita Panicker’s article God’s own badlands (December 16). I belong to Kashmir and till 1986 there was little by way of communal clashes between the majority Muslims and Hindu pandits.

india Updated: Dec 18, 2008 23:43 IST

I fully endorse the sense of foreboding expressed in Lalita Panicker’s article God’s own badlands (December 16). I belong to Kashmir and till 1986 there was little by way of communal clashes between the majority Muslims and Hindu pandits. There were many Islamic schools run by Kashmiri mullahs in the Valley but none could influence their pupils to ‘take to’ jihad. Around 1986, a lot of new mosques had sprung up across the Valley and they recruited teachers who were not from the Valley. It was these radical mullahs who changed everything in the Valley between 1986 and 1991.
Navin Tikoo, via email

II
The article was alarming to say the least. Recruiters obviously infiltrate better than we can imagine. I was even more disturbed to read that terrorism is now a job option. The best counter to this process of radicalisation must come by way of spreading the message of peace and tolerance and by cutting through the poison-tree of jihadi violence that will spread far and wide unless uprooted from the source.
Lalitha Khanna, via email

III
Typically a religious institution is for locals, and the amount spent to build and maintain the institution will be proportional to the local religious community’s financial status, unless it is an ancient place of worship visited regularly by outsiders. I have seen huge mosques and madrassas built in villages in central Kerala where the Muslim population is minuscule and no way do they have the wherewithal to finance such buildings. Where does the money come from? Is the money coming from Muslim NRIs in the Gulf? If yes, then are these payments accounted for? If no, then the government must consider setting up a regulatory framework to account for the new madrassas.
Jay P, via email

A crisis of confidence
Apropos of the editorial Time to splash the cash (December 15), economies prosper as much on perception as on other measurable factors. Job layoffs, plummeting demand and a bear run in the Sensex have gripped the entire Indian economy with fear. It is to be noted that instances of risky sub-prime lending and massive loan defaults, which triggered the crisis in the US, do not exist in India. Here we have had a contagious effect. We face a crisis of confidence rather than finance. Instead of panicking we just need to rebuild our faith and steer the economy out of the mess.
Ashwani Sharma, Ghaziabad

Can’t get it write
Either I do not have the intellect to comprehend Kushalrani Gulab’s article Running out of time (December 16) or she is too vague. I am sure that there are better ways to read books than she suggests. May I ask her to read Francis Bacon’s essay Of Studies? That might give her some tips about ways to read a book.
M Shamsur Rabb Khan, Delhi

Revamp intelligence instead
The new terror law is outrageous. Parliament has tabled this merely to get the heat off itself. If the taxpayers’ money should indeed be wasted, please can we use it to improve intelligence and train the NSG better? What sickens me is the proposal that there will be “life in jail for those who fund terror”. This sounds noble but if Kandahar/IC-814 is anything to go by, our people will be kidnapped and our planes hijacked to get the terror masterminds out of jail and our ministers will escort them to terrorists, posing for the cameras.
Aanchal Anand, St Petersburg