The Djokovic-Nadal tussle was a winner for every tennis lover | india | Hindustan Times
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The Djokovic-Nadal tussle was a winner for every tennis lover

india Updated: Jan 31, 2012 22:37 IST

Hindustan Times
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The Djokovic-Nadal tussle was a winner for every tennis lover

It is not an easy task to win a marathon five-setter tennis match that lasts nearly six hours. Kudos to Novak Djokovic for that near-impossible feat in the Australian Open men’s finals. Djokovic’s tussle with Rafael Nadal was a feast for tennis lovers across the world. That is not to make light of Leander Paes’s victory. He proved once again that he is the best tennis player India has.
Kavitha Srikanth, Mumbai

Real issues are caste aside
With reference to the report Battle for states (January 31), India, it seems, is fated to be plagued by the different configurations of castes like Scheduled Castes and Other Backward Castes. The politics of reserving quotas only marginalises the poor and increases the power of those in government. No political party is willing to talk about development issues that affect people across the board. Somehow, the focus always shifts from the real problems to artificial divisions of caste and class.
Sabika Razvi, via email

More commission, less omission
With reference to the editorial EC come and EC go (The Pundit, January 30), the Election Commission is right in asking political parties to follow the code of conduct to ensure that the democratic exercise is conducted smoothly. By coming down heavily on parties and forcing them to reduce poll expenses, the EC has managed to improve the situation. The electorate is more sensible today and the EC must be lauded for improving the poll process.
Rajan Kalia, via email

Taking ages over his age
This refers to the report Age row: Army told to fix DOB (January 30). The government’s directive to the army headquarters to change the records at this belated stage seems like an afterthought, perhaps to avoid further embarrassment.
Onkar Nath Saxena, Noida