The elephant and the dragon are not quite in sync | india | Hindustan Times
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The elephant and the dragon are not quite in sync

I agree with Debasish Roy Chowdhury’s views on India’s needless suspicion of China (Bull in our China shop, May 21). Irrespective of the outcome of the 1962 war, the Indian government seems predisposed towards reading too much into China’s every political and economic move.

india Updated: May 24, 2010 00:14 IST

I agree with Debasish Roy Chowdhury’s views on India’s needless suspicion of China (Bull in our China shop, May 21). Irrespective of the outcome of the 1962 war, the Indian government seems predisposed towards reading too much into China’s every political and economic move. This sense of mistrust is also heightened by China’s unresponsive attitude toward India’s overtures. To foster friendly relations, it’s important for both countries to cooperate and be transparent about their policies as far as possible.

Abhishek Nagar, Delhi

II

Debasish Roy Chowdhury’s argument, that it’s pointless to dig up the past and harp on the 1962 Indo-China war, was valid. To spoil the present bilateral relations based on what took place decades ago is going to prove harmful for both countries. However, it pays to be vigilant.

R.L. Pathak, Delhi

Conservation for preservation

This has reference to the report Laila threat weakens (May 21). With every passing year, the number of natural calamities that our world is facing seems to be increasing. This is a clear indicator of impending doom. Mankind’s increased consumption over the years has led to this imbalance in nature. It’s because of the increased destruction of rainforests and coastal areas that the ecosystem is gradually breaking down. In order to reverse this decline, we need to make a conscious effort to conserve and protect our environment if we’re to sustain ourselves in the long run.

Hansraj Bhat, Mumbai

It’s still hanging fire

It seems the Delhi government has little intention of clearing the air about the hanging of Afzal Guru (Hang Afzal, says Sheila, with rider, May 19). After holding up his mercy petition file for years, the Sheila Dikshit government has finally woken up, only because 26/11 convict Ajmal Kasab’s death sentence necessitates it to act on Guru’s mercy petition. The Congress government fears that hanging Guru may rub the Pakistanis, or the public, the wrong way and, thus, is simply procrastinating by thrusting the responsibility on the Centre for fear of unrest.

Manish Garg, Noida

Fuelling Naxalism’s growth

With reference to the editorial Their place, their time (Our Take, May 19), our half-hearted efforts at tackling Naxalism have worsened the problem so much that it is now threatening the sovereignty of the Indian State.

The Naxalites are a handful of misguided ideologues who believe they can hold the State to ransom. What’s worse is that the Centre, by not acting decisively against them, is only encouraging them. It’s a fact that Naxalism has grown to dangerous proportions primarily due to the State’s negligence of the tribal areas. Instead of blaming each other for the crisis, the Centre and the states must immediately get their act together to address the problem.

Ved Guliani, Hisar

Where’s the femillennium?

Devaki Jain in Women’s worth (May 19) has brilliantly described the contribution of the common woman to sustaining the basic fibre of our country’s socio-economic sector. Despite women’s tireless and unceasing contribution in various spheres of social life, it is a pity that our male-dominated and gender-biased society refuses to give women their due and acknowledge them as potent instruments of social transformation. I recall the great political leader, Robert Green Ingersoll, who said, “There will never be a generation of great men until there has been a generation of free women.”

Ashutosh Garg, Delhi