The fight against terror should begin at home | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Jul 24, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

The fight against terror should begin at home

Vir Sanghvi, in After the blasts (Counterpoint, September 21), appreciably analysed the problem of terrorism and suggested ways to strengthen intelligence.

india Updated: Sep 27, 2008 22:26 IST

Vir Sanghvi, in After the blasts (Counterpoint, September 21), appreciably analysed the problem of terrorism and suggested ways to strengthen intelligence. But I do not agree with him on the subject of fighting terrorism. The root cause of terrorism in India is all domestic and preventive steps can be more effective in combating it. The government must create awareness through media. Besides, the religious leaders should give a call to the youth to desist from destabilising the peace of the society.

SV Taneja , Delhi

II

The Lack of accountable intelligence network is one of the causes as mentioned by Vir Sanghvi. The main culprit, however, is the political leadership of the central government that has proved all along complacent. This started with Kashmir where forces of separatism were in full cry right from 1947. Scores of separatist politicians received favours from the same institution which they abused at public rallies. Separatism in the name of Islam and jihad has been openly justified. The appeasement attitude of the Centre not only undermined the national interests but also strengthened the disruptive forces to mushroom in the valley and then in rest of the country. The political parties cared only for their vote-bank.

PL Bakhshi, Chicago

III

I Agree with Vir Sanghvi that sacking of the Home Minister is not the solution. But his argument that strong laws like Pota could not prevent attack on Parliament House does not hold water. In that case, Section 302 must be deleted from the Indian Penal Code as murders continue to be committed. Strong laws might not prevent crimes, but they help in punishing criminals.

KS Bhalla, Delhi

Caste victim

Aditya Ghosh's report, Sanskrit boulevard (September 21), on the coverage of Sanskrit-speaking village of Jhiri in Madhya Pradesh was praiseworthy. I remember visiting the villages of Shimoga, in Karnataka, two years ago, along with a TV crew of Bangalore Doordarshan where we shot the daily routines of Sanskrit-speaking Brahmins. Pity that the language could not flourish there due to the caste divides.

Raj Narain Bisaria, Delhi

Wake up, the phone’s ringing

Through his article, Late night phone calls (Sunday Sentiments, September 21), Karan Thapar opened my wounds once again. I’m reminded of my friend with whom I spent 15 years in Bombay and who later settled in London. By chance, I got his number after three decades. Hoping to give him the surprise of his life, I gave him a call. His wife picked up the phone and scolded badly for disturbing them at night. Then it was the friend’s turn. He said that it was not the right time to disturb someone at midnight. As you may well imagine, it took me weeks to reassemble myself.

BK Kumra, Delhi