The government should look at all shades of opinion on licences | india | Hindustan Times
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The government should look at all shades of opinion on licences

The government should consider the merits and demerits of granting or cancelling licences for environment-related projects to private players, as stated in the editorial The bends in our rivers (Our Take, August 28).

india Updated: Aug 30, 2010 23:00 IST

The government should look at all shades of opinion on licences

The government should consider the merits and demerits of granting or cancelling licences for environment-related projects to private players, as stated in the editorial The bends in our rivers (Our Take, August 28). Discontinuing a vital project like Loharinag Pala in Uttarakhand, without evaluating its pros and cons, is unjustified. The hydroelectric project, apart from generating 600 MW of clean and renewable energy, would have also helped in preventing floods. The move will result in a big loss, both economic and ecological, to Uttarakhand. The authorities concerned should revaluate their decision keeping in mind the state’s welfare.

N.P. Singh, Dehradun

Dragon’s breath on our neck

The report General snub: Chinese envoy pleads ignorance (August 29) proves that India and China are not on friendly terms, contrary to what the governments of both nations are trying to project. Though New Delhi recognises Tibet as a sovereign part of Tibet, Beijing hasn’t yet made its opinion on Kashmir public. China considers India to be its biggest competitor in Asia and is using all its might to establish supremacy in the continent. It is flouting international laws and making inroads in Arunachal Pradesh, which is an integral part of India. Our existing foreign policy is insufficient to deal with China.

Rakshit Chopra, Manipal

Death of social responsibility

It was shocking to read the report She gave birth, died. Delhi walked by (August 29). The incident exposes Delhiites’ double standards. They condemn the authorities for not providing basic facilities, but forget about their responsibilities as citizens of one of the most advanced cities in the world? Do we need a law to make people realise that they should help someone who’s dying?

Richa Parihar, via email