The horse has bolted, it's too late to close the Adarsh barn | india | Hindustan Times
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The horse has bolted, it's too late to close the Adarsh barn

With reference to the editorial Built on a house of cards (Our Take, January 18), environment minister Jairam Ramesh has finally woken up to the fact that the Adarsh housing society violates Coastal Regulation Zone norms.

india Updated: Jan 20, 2011 00:29 IST

The horse has bolted, it's too late to close the Adarsh barn
With reference to the editorial Built on a house of cards (Our Take, January 18), environment minister Jairam Ramesh has finally woken up to the fact that the Adarsh housing society violates Coastal Regulation Zone norms. Why did he or his ministry not raise objections when the project was passed? And on what basis were the flats allotted to army officers and other public officials when they were meant for Kargil war widows?
Vishal Bhambhani, Ujjain

The environment ministry's order to demolish the semi-constructed Adarsh society's façade is not a wise decision, as millions of rupees have already been spent on its construction. Instead, the government should cancel the allotment of flats to anyone other than the intended recipients. This way the nation will save people's money and do justice to the families of the Kargil martyrs.
RD Bhardwaj, Delhi

Practise what you preach
With reference to the report Stop corruption: India Inc to govt (January 18), the nation will benefit if the suggestions made by the representatives of India Inc - on curbing corruption - to the government are properly implemented. It's also important that industrialists also assure that they won't indulge in corrupt practices while seeking licences and clearances, won't stash black money abroad and not interfere in policymaking.
Dev Gulati, via email

Does not yield desired results
The report Free up veggie trade to fix crisis: Montek (January 18) shows that there is at least someone in the government who's realised the need to free farmers from the clutches of middlemen. But this alone may not solve India's food problem, as the agricultural land is shrinking. The government must realise that our land acquisition policies are forcing cultivators to sell their assets to private developers. Unless it is checked, food prices will continue to spiral
Raakesh Bhatia, Delhi

Losing a grip on policies
With reference to the editorial Taking one bite at a time (Our Take, January 17) it's disheartening to know that the government is undecided on the issue of food security when some of the best economists of India are at the helm of the government. The reason for the price rise is wrong policies, not a shortfall in grain production. It is a matter of shame that while millions go to sleep empty stomach everyday, Parliament canteen sells food at highly subsidised rates to well-to-do public officials.
Sreemoy Ghose, via email

Swami and his vision of India
Kudos to Aditya Sen for his write-up The otherworld is not enough (January 14) where he brings to light various aspects of Swami Vivekananda's life. Both Vivekananda and Mahatma Gandhi had a lot in common. Both were original thinkers, visionaries and believed in the strength of Indian culture. It's disappointing that the 'sleeping giant', as Vivekananda called India, is today struggling with problems like consumerism, corruption and misgovernance.
Pendyala S, via email

At the expense of public welfare
This refers to the report Petrol price up, to fuel inflation (January 16). The recurring hike in the prices of petroleum products over the last three months has added fuel to the fire of inflation. An increase in fuel prices adds to the prices of many other commodities like milk and gas, as transportation cost goes up. The government should curb its expenses. It can perhaps start by not making the upcoming Republic Day celebrations a gala affair.
CP Hariharan, via email