The India-Pakistan talk-fests always end up as slug-fests | india | Hindustan Times
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The India-Pakistan talk-fests always end up as slug-fests

With reference to the report Indo-Pak talks stall at terror roadblock (July 16), our successive governments' knee-jerk reactions to the various Indo-Pakistan talks till date have failed to force Pakistan to curb cross-border terrorism.

india Updated: Jul 18, 2010 22:05 IST

With reference to the report Indo-Pak talks stall at terror roadblock (July 16), our successive governments' knee-jerk reactions to the various Indo-Pakistan talks till date have failed to force Pakistan to curb cross-border terrorism. The latest gaffe by our External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna, of tacitly agreeing with criticism of the home secretary's statement on Pakistan, has embarrassed the country. Add to it Islamabad's outright rejection of our dossiers on the 26/11 attacks and it's clear that New Delhi is incapable of making Islamabad realise its shortcomings.
Raghubir Singh, Pune

As expected, the talks between India and Pakistan failed. The questions and answers exchanged between the senior leaders of both nations at the press conference in Islamabad on Thursday proved that while Pakistan doesn't expect anything from the talks, India is clueless about the entire affair. Pakistan's Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi's comparison of Hafiz Saeed's hate-speeches with the remarks of Home Secretary G.K. Pillai deserves severe condemnation.
Karan Thakur, Delhi

All's well only if it ends well
Samar Halarnkar in Islands in the storm (Maha Bharat, July 15) rightly states that the UPA shouldn't expect to return to power until it plugs the loopholes in its administration. It's one thing to launch social welfare schemes, build highways and roads and institute high-level committees, but quite another to ensure their functioning. The benefit of the government's plans and policies will reach the common man only when their execution is given as much consideration as their planning.
Chhavi Choudhary, via email

Let your work speak for you
The editorial Round up the usual suspects (Our Take, July 15) gave a befitting reply to the Chhattisgarh government which has warned social activists against criticising its policies on tackling the Maoist menace. In a democracy like India, everyone, including activists, has the right to express his/her opinion. If the state government is wary of people criticising its policies, then it should perform its duties properly.
Sreemoy Ghose, Delhi

Shackled by a mob mentality
The report Mob burns homes of murder suspects (July 14) exposes a failure of law and order. This incident, coupled with various instances of mob violence in Kashmir recently, shows that we're inching towards mobocracy. One is reminded of former American diplomat Peter Galbraith who said, "In India, there is a functional anarchy." It is the responsibility of both the government and people to realise that violence begets violence and that pelting stones or burning vehicles does not constitute justice.
B.M. Lall, via email

Don't look back in anger
Samrat in Remember to forget (July 14) looks at the Kashmir problem in its entirety. An agreement among India, Pakistan and the separatists in the Valley is one solution to both the recent violence and the bigger Kashmir problem. But since it won't ever happen, the alternative is to, as Samrat suggests, let go of past problems. Both India and Pakistan are nuclear States and one wrong step by either nation could prove disastrous for the entire subcontinent. The recent unrest in the Valley can be attributed to anti-national elements, which want to further strain the relationship between India and Pakistan.
Sharda Bhargav, via email