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The master of the patriot game

Kudos to Hindustan Times for publishing RK Kaushik’s article Bhagat Singh, the final hours (3600, October 9).

india Updated: Oct 16, 2011 00:48 IST

The master of the patriot game
Kudos to Hindustan Times for publishing RK Kaushik’s article Bhagat Singh, the final hours (3600, October 9). It was disheartening to read about how the half-burnt bodies of Bhagat Singh and his companions were thrown in the Sutlej river. Most Indians have grown up watching various movies based on Singh, but no one has yet done an extensive research on the great patriot’s life. I look forward to reading more such articles in the future.

Samiul Hassan Quadri, Bikaner


People were unaware of many facts about Singh’s life that Kaushik reveals. It was indeed brave of Singh to have refused to wear a mask before being hanged to death. People will always remember him for the supreme sacrifices he made for the nation.

RN Sharma, via email


One for all, one for one
With reference to the article Petals make this lotus (Chanakya, October 9), BJP president Nitin Gadkari exhibited his leadership skills by deftly handling the issue of Gujarat CM Narendra Modi’s absence from the party’s national executive meet. If Gadkari continues to put the party’s interests above any individual’s, as he did in Modi’s case, the BJP can expect to return to power at the Centre in 2014.

Prashant Rakheja, Gurgaon


By remaining absent from the national executive meet, Modi has sent a message to the BJP high command that he is above the party. It seems he thinks that unlike other BJP leaders Sushma Swaraj, Arun Jaitley or even LK Advani — he can go it alone in the 2014 polls. It wouldn’t be a surprise if Modi soon floats his own party and gives the BJP a run for its money.

Bhartendu Sood, via email

For better or for verse
Indrajit Hazra’s article So you dig poetry? (Red Herring, October 9) makes for interesting reading. It’s true that people appreciate novels and poems more when they are written by famous authors/poets. Publishers have also realised this fact and, so, they are in a mad race to cash in on the work of established authors/poets.

Nageshwant Roy Vaid, via email

It’s true that there are more poetry writers than readers. I believe it’s easier to read a novel, as it takes the reader on a journey where he is on ‘autopilot mode’, following the story without reading between the lines or finding hidden meanings. But one may not always enjoy poetry, as poems are usually not self-explanatory by nature. And even if they are, it takes time to grasp their real meaning and appreciate them.

Shaun Williams, via email

Reform for reformers first
This refers to Karan Thapar’s article Can Anna hack it? (Sunday Sentiments, October 9). Why is it that a bill to revise the salaries of our parliamentarians gets passed in Parliament without any debate, but bills related to giving reservations to women or establishing a lokpal are always kept on the back burner? It shows that our parliamentarians lack the will to reform the system. Moreover, when activists like Anna Hazare stand up to demand their rights, critics like Thapar try to rain on their parade.

Sangeeta Sharma Dhaor, Ghaziabad

We’re missing the woods here
We have read news reports on illegal activities threatening the existence of rare species of animals and birds. But Chetan Chauhan’s article Knock on wood (The Big Story, October 9) about how mining is taking a toll on our forests comes as a surprise. It’s clear that various government agencies responsible for mining various resources are only concerned about doing their duty. They don’t care about the environment. The environment ministry must step in and take charge of the situation.

Ayushi Khare, Indore