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The mysterious will remain

india Updated: Sep 11, 2008 22:04 IST

The mysterious will remain


Apropos of the report Hunt for god particle (September 11), a lot of public expectations are riding on the high energy experiment now being conducted at CERN. Scientists hope to look deeper into the structure of matter and meaning of the word ‘mass’. New breakthroughs in particle physics may occur. But there will be no answers on the origin of the universe or the purpose of life as expected by some people. Knowledge and ignorance always go together. The unknown will remain much greater than the known. That is the beauty of scientific research.


MK Khera, Delhi

Look beyond trivial issues
Rajdeep Sardesai in A tale of two Azmis (Beyond the byte, September 5) has made some pertinent comments on our shallow secularism. It is important to look beyond our stereotypical notions of religion, community and secularism before making statements against people who dare to speak the truth. The article was written boldly, with an understanding of the different nuances of tags like ‘liberal’ and ‘fundamentalist’. People who have criticised Shabana Azmi for airing her views should look beyond their limited vision.
Shabnam Khan, Gurgaon

II
The media often sensationalises non-issues ignoring Muslims’ real problems. The moment these problems are taken up by liberal Muslims, they are branded ‘irresponsible’ as in the case of Shabana Azmi. When the Taliban demolished the Bamiyan Buddhas, ‘Islam in crisis’ became a favoured term. But when thousands of kar sevaks pulled down the Babri Masjid, it wasn’t Hinduism but an extreme fringe that was blamed for such an outrage. And those like Shabana Azmi are victims of it.
Naushad Ansari, Delhi

III
Shabana Azmi’s outburst attracted criticism because even her admirers were left guessing whether it was spontaneous or intentional. She should have exercised caution knowing full well that the media tend to turn every celebrity-related molehill into a mountain. Denying a Muslim accommodation could just be due to an insistence on a particular food habit, an offshoot of a cultural gap.
Dilip Amritphale, Ujjain

IV
The Indian film industry is just another creative business like advertising, cooking, journalism or banking. The probability of a person’s intellectual strength being high or low is same as that in any other profession. The film industry showcases India to the world, defines its identity and has been resilient despite decades of official neglect. This industry should be celebrated for its creative prowess and for its ability to bring Indians together. In that regard, I think Rajdeep owes the Indian film fraternity an apology.
Vanita Kohli-Khandekar, via email

Zardari’s peace formula
With reference to the editorial Coming to the aid of parties (Our Take, September 9), I think the step taken by Pakistan’s President Asif Ali Zardari to usher in an era of peace and cooperation with India will prove fruitful for both countries. But before declaring any bilateral talks with India, he should prove his good intentions by stopping cross-border terrorism at once. I welcome his brave step and hope to see harmony and brotherhood between the feuding neighbours.
Tarun Madan, Delhi