Three major encounters | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 21, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Three major encounters

Although there were three official wars between the two countries, there have been other instances where India and Pakistan have come very close to the same.

india Updated: Dec 27, 2008 20:01 IST

Although there were three official wars between the two countries, there have been other instances where India and Pakistan have come very close to the same.

The Rann of Kutch: April 1965

A clash between border patrols erupted into fighting in the Rann of Kutch, a region along the south-western Indo-Pakistani border. India was forced to retreat after intense fighting, Pakistan claimed victory.

Siachen Glacier 1984

The 6,000-meter high Siachen Glacier is the highest battlefield in the world. It is located in the Karakoram Range System of Kashmir near the India-Pakistan border, beyond the stern end of the Line of Control that defines Kashmir. Pakistan controlled the area but in 1984, the Indian army arrived early in spring to capture the unmened Pakistani side as well. Since then hundreds have died, less from bullets but more from the harsh climate of the mountains in an effort from Pakistan to defend territory. Musharraf has said that any settlement on Siachen depends on a solution to Kashmir as whole. Daily, it costs India $10 million and Pakistan $5 million to maintain their troops for the battle here.

Kargil May 1999

In May 1999, Kashmiri freedom fighters mounted into the Indian-controlled Kargil region of Kashmir. The resulting battle led to India loosing thousands of soldiers, according to US military intelligence.

Pakistan forced the Kashmiri freedom fighters to withdraw under American pressure, but the incursion successfully brought back world attention to the issue of Kashmir, which had been almost forgotten. India accused Pakistan of planning the infiltration which may be true since the nature of the capture was exactly the same as Siachen Glacier, capturing a position which is traditionally not monitored during the winter from any side.