Too early to predict the political futures of Varun and Rahul | india | Hindustan Times
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Too early to predict the political futures of Varun and Rahul

Khushwant Singh presents an interesting comparison between the two young Gandhis — Rahul and Varun — in his article The politics — all in the Gandhi family (With Malice Towards One and All, February 21).

india Updated: Feb 27, 2010 23:38 IST

Khushwant Singh presents an interesting comparison between the two young Gandhis — Rahul and Varun — in his article The politics — all in the Gandhi family (With Malice Towards One and All, February 21). Rahul’s political astuteness can be measured from the fact that he is among the few leaders who have risen up to Shiv Sena chief Bal Thackeray’s authority. However, Varun is yet to prove his political calibre. But it’s too early to jump the gun and either write off Varun from national politics or declare Rahul to be the next prime minister of India.

Bal Govind, Noida

Victims of mass amnesia

Pramit Pal Chaudhuri’s analysis on Indians’ reaction to terror attacks is accurate (They are back, The Big Story, February 21). It’s true that the brouhaha over a terrorist attack fades away even before the government catches the perpetrators. Our inability to learn lessons from past experiences makes us an easy target for terrorists. The bomb blast in Pune could have been averted if the government had acted available intelligence inputs and if people had been more alert. Hopefully, post-Pune, the Centre will ensure there are no more terrorist attacks in India.

Himmat Singh, via email

Attack is the best form of defence

With reference to Vir Sanghvi’s article Take the battle into the enemy’s camp (Counterpoint, February 21), the recent killing of Mahmoud al-Mabhouh, military commander of Hamas, by Israel’s intelligence agency Mossad proves that attack is the best form of defence. Instead of adopting a tit-for-tat policy against Pakistan, India is wasting time by waiting for the international community to urge Pakistan to dismantle its terror networks. The government seems to care more about the nation’s image than it does about its people’s lives. Despite several terrorist attacks, it has failed to realise that peace talks will not resolve the problem of cross-border terrorism.

Manoj Parashar, Noida

II

After the 26/11 Mumbai attack, many Indians felt it was high time that our policy of forget-and-forgive was reconsidered. Post-Pune blasts, the government must re-think its strategy on terrorism: whether it wants to continue with its wait-and-watch approach or is ready to take the bull by the horns. Being friendly with a hostile neighbour will prove counterproductive for India in the long run.

P.L. Bakhshi, via email

Nowhere to walk

With reference to Indrajit Hazra’s article So very pedestrian (Red Herring, February 21), the absence of pavements in their city doesn’t seem to affect most Delhiites. Enamoured by a glamorous city life, they have no qualms about the fact that streets and roads in Delhi are by no means pedestrian-friendly. The credit for this must go to our politicians who drain the common man of all his money in the form of taxes and yet do not provide him with basic facilities. Worse, by appeasing only a certain privileged section of society, our leaders have managed to keep all criticism at bay.

Ashish Rai, via email

Budget woes

Manas Chakravarty’s article In the words of… (Loose Canon, February 21) dealt with an interesting subject of who the finance minister would quote in his Budget speech. The truth is that it didn’t matter to the common man whom the
FM quoted because this year’s Budget failed to address the problems of inflation and price rise. A hike in petrol and diesel prices will increase the prices of essential commodities and add to the common man’s woes.

G.K. Arora, Delhi

The bigger threat

It’s naive to focus on bigger issues like global terrorism and its impact on India while ignoring homegrown threats. Karan Thapar, like many journalists, presents a detailed analysis on the Af-Pak policy and the US’s role in dealing with Islamic terrorism in his article The Pune message (Sunday Sentiments, February 21). But he fails to take note of local involvement in the execution of the Pune bomb blast, which, at the moment, should be the biggest concern for us.

Ramesh Malhotra, Delhi