Truth’s become a casualty | india | Hindustan Times
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Truth’s become a casualty

With reference to Pankaj Vohra’s article More than just number crunching (July 21), the present political crisis is a result not of any lack of strategy on the part of the UPA, but due to the self-interest of a few individuals.

india Updated: Jul 22, 2008 22:09 IST

With reference to Pankaj Vohra’s article More than just number crunching (July 21), the present political crisis is a result not of any lack of strategy on the part of the UPA, but due to the self-interest of a few individuals. The current stand-off over the deal has revealed the murky nature of Indian politics. It has devoured whatever little was left of words like propriety and morality. It is a shame that the deal will be decided not by mainstream political outfits who have their own reasons to support or oppose it, but by defectors, deserters and criminals who are in jail or under trial. It is not the truth that wins, but whatever wins becomes the truth.

R.K. Malhotra, Delhi

II

Apropos of the editorial The bitter aftertaste of bargains and barters (July 22), the run-up to the trust vote shows much that is wrong with Indian politics. Several Members of Parliament have put their votes up for sale. Talking about national interest is the new cliché. This explains the middle-class cynicism about politics being a dirty business where even miscreants can become ministers. Sadly, this is not the first or the last instance of this dirty business.

Chintan Puri, Faridabad

III

The scenes inside and outside Parliament are becoming nauseating. The exchange of invectives, allegations of crores changing hands and the brazen horse-trading preceding the vote of confidence has brought forth the worst in our politics. Let’s hope the people remember faces and give them a fitting reply when they go to seek votes in future.

R.J. Khurana, Bhopal

Smitten by Maya’s maya

One can only watch with dismay when a politician like Mayawati is discussed as a potential prime ministerial candidate. While such talk from politicians is hardly surprising, the manner in which the media are projecting her recent political successes is shocking. Is this because she is a Dalit and political correctness dictates that one turns a blind eye to her many failings? The day may come when this lady does become India’s Prime Minister, but that will be a sad day for all right-thinking people in this country.

Himadri Ghosh, Gurgaon

No prominence for Pandits

Neelesh Misra’s article She lived to tell her story (July 20) was a fine one that reflected the plight of the Kashmiri Pandits over the years. Misra also highlights the misuse of power by security forces. Misra’s articles on insurgency have always been full of facts tinged with sensitivity, but when he writes on the Pandits, it is placed in some obscure corner of the newspaper. Is there a pattern here?

Pooja Shali, via email