Two Nobel Peace laureates to meet in Dharamsala | india | Hindustan Times
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Two Nobel Peace laureates to meet in Dharamsala

As South Africa refused to issue visa to Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama for his visit, now Nobel Peace Laureate, Archbishop Desmond Tutu will arrive at Dharamsala to meet his 'close friend'.

india Updated: Feb 09, 2012 21:30 IST
Naresh Kumar

As South Africa refused to issue visa to Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama for his visit, now Nobel Peace laureate, Archbishop Desmond Tutu will arrive at Dharamsala to meet his 'close friend'.


Archbishop Tutu who is currently on a five day visit to India is expected to reach the exile seat of his fellow Nobel Peace laureate on Friday.

Tutu was in India as a part of 'The Elders'- a group of independent global leaders brought together by former South African president Nelson Mandela in 2007.

The group is working on creating awareness on an initiative "Girls Not Brides" a global partnership to end child marriage.

Archbishop Tutu will attend a public ceremony to be held in Tsuglakhang temple at Mcleodganj.

Sources told that the Dalai Lama will himself receive, Archbishop Tutu at Gaggal Airport. Both are also expected to engage in a moderate discussion on various international issues including peace.

Both the internationally renowned peace figures were scheduled to meet in October last year on the occasion of 80th birth anniversary of Archbishop Tutu in South Africa but the Dalai Lama had to call off his trip at the eleventh hour after repeated visa delay.

The Dalai Lama was invited to South Africa by anti- apartheid icon, Archbishop Tutu to attend an international conference and deliver a lecture on the occasion.

The Spiritual leader was also scheduled to receive Mahatma Gandhi International Peace prize and speak at various events. However, after visa denial both shared their thoughts through a video link.

The South African government's visa denial was linked to pressure from China, a major trade partner of Pretoria. The South African government's decision had sparked an outrage with citizens and leaders blasting their government for buckling under China's pressure.

Archbishop Tutu had criticized his government saying that South African government was worse than the apartheid government because all this was expected from an apartheid government.