ULFA anti-talk group rejects other faction's demand charter | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Sep 20, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

ULFA anti-talk group rejects other faction's demand charter

The Ulfa anti-talk faction, led by 'commander-in-chief' Paresh Barua, today rejected the charter of demands submitted by the pro-talk faction to Union home minister P Chidambaram.

india Updated: Aug 06, 2011 19:13 IST

The Ulfa anti-talk faction, led by 'commander-in-chief' Paresh Barua, on Saturday rejected the charter of demands submitted by the pro-talk faction to Union home minister P Chidambaram.

"The charter of demands, submitted by chairman Arabinda Rajkhowa and other leaders who were recently released from jail, is against aims, objectives, ideals and basic principles and is not acceptable to us," the Publicity Secretary of the outfit's pro-talk faction Arunodoy Dohotiya said in a statement e-mailed to the media in Guwahati.

The charter is "meaningless and merely a document which reflects the conspiracy of the intelligence agency to thwart the struggle of indigenous Assamese to realise their genuine aspirations", he said.

"What is the need for a charter of demand when after years of struggle, the Ulfa leaders would sit face to face with the rulers for negotiation? A political solution to a political issue is possible through negotiations and not by placing a charter of demands," the statement continued.

The outfit had continued its 'armed struggle' for years "to ensure that justice is done to the indigenous people and their aspirations are met with and for this we do not need a section of intellectuals to prepare a document for us in this regard," the Ulfa anti-talk faction further said.

It said on several occasions, the Ulfa had asserted that it was in favour of a political negotiated settlement of a political issue "but will not compromise with Assam's sovereignty."

Expressing its opposition to the talks between the pro-talk faction and Centre on August 5, 2011, the statement said this date would now be observed as a 'Black day' for "the indigenous people of the state" and claimed more than 13,000 people had lost their lives in last 32 years during Ulfa 'struggle'.