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UNPA meet brings cheer to Cong camp

india Updated: Jul 04, 2008 01:07 IST
Saroj Nagi

Congress hopes of the Samajwadi Party backing the UPA government if the Left withdraws support over the nuclear deal soared after the UNPA meeting here on Thursday. But it was unsure about the nature of the SP’s backing amid speculation that Mulayam Singh Yadav may offer issue-based support to the government.

“I am not unhappy with the UNPA stand. It is not negative. It reflects the beginning of the journey for reconciliation and taking appropriate decisions. But what kind of support they will give is not clear,” said Veerappa Moily, AICC media department chairman. Former President APJ Abdul Kalam's endorsement of the deal to the SP leaders brought more cheer to the Congress.

The Congress had never expected the SP to give an early decision on the issue. "Any party has to have a dialogue (before deciding). In fact, decisions taken on impulse may not be sustainable,'' said Moily.

Though other UNPA constituents such as the TDP and INLD are known to be anti-Congress, the Congress is ready to carry anyone along on the issue of the deal. "There is no untouchability,'' Moily said, refusing to elaborate.

Some Congress leaders were however hoping that the SP with 39 MPs in the Lok Sabha goes not join the government once it comes on board. "If they do, and we have to allot seats in the council of ministers on the basis of their parliamentary strength, there will be a big mess,'' said a well placed Congress leader.

But the party, which has been soft-pedalling on the Left's anti-deal stand, began to prepare for a war of words once the UPA and Left part ways. "The Left should be clear whether they want to fight communal forces or a proxy war for communal parties,'' said Moily.

He wondered why the Left was "panicking'' when the PM had assured them that he would not operationalise the deal until Parliament and the country are taken into confidence.