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Use house plants to suit your taste

india Updated: Jan 08, 2008 15:29 IST
DPA
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Whether you like them hanging, climbing or branching out in all directions, there's a house plant to match your taste, budget and, most importantly, interior decorating plans.

"Targeted use of house plants can accentuate your style and create harmony," says the Luebeck-based Julia Sickermann, an interior decorator.

An avant-garde look, for example, would be dominated by cool designs and elegant materials such as stainless steel, leather and high quality plastics.

"Avant-gardists will tend to pick strong plants that grow especially large," says Klaus Wagener, a world champion florist from Minden.

Guenther Sator, a feng-shui expert based in Mattsee in Austria adds that avant-gardists love succulent plants because they grow in unusual shapes and are easy to care for.

"Thanks to their slow growth, you can retain their structural elements for a long time," he adds. Smaller plants can be arranged in a glass bowl or ceramic block filled with sand, rocks and gnarled roots to create a miniature desert garden.

Cacti are another good idea. "You create attractive views, scenery and niches by potting them in large earth toned, sand-filled pots," says John Langley, a professional florist from Hamburg.

The "prestige-oriented classicist" customer has tastes similar to the avant-gardist. He is goal-oriented, ambitious and prefers a simple, functional style with modern, technical elements, says Sator. Azaleas, camellia and gardenias in amorphous pots work well in this environment. These customers prefer to combine multiple plants of the same kind.

Country style covers everything from rustic ambience, the Scandinavian natural, the British manor house to a Mediterranean theme. That means the plants for each look are just as varied. Begonias or kalanchoe are well suited to rustic farmhouse furniture, especially when placed in a ceramic pot on the windowsill. Meanwhile, a Scandinavian wardrobe can be complemented by a simple birch fig in a zinc pot.

Trendy apartments also include a wide variety of options. Light grey and silver often create a great background for bright accents, like a fiery guzmania or a lavish marantaceae.

"Plants are often seen as decorative elements, which means they should have that effect," says Langley.

"Experimental trendsetters don't always have a big budget, but will work with alternative elements. Sometimes they'll plant something in a tin can, or sometimes in a pot they've decorated themselves," says Wagener.

That way, a person can turn a cheap plastic pot into a nest of fruits or ferns. Alternatively, a glass pot can be upgraded with a mesh of wire, pearls and twigs.

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