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Valley of pain

india Updated: Feb 03, 2007 00:42 IST
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Highlight Story

In her article Our silence is killing (January 27), Barkha Dutt  expresses concern for the victimisation of Kashmiri Muslims with regard to the Tariq Dar case. But two questions come to mind. Why demand a public apology only from the Indian government, why not also from the government of Bangladesh, which kept him in custody on charges of being an alleged R&AW agent? Second, when we show our concern for the Kashmiri people, why does that not include the lakhs of Kashmiri Pandits who were driven out of Kashmir because of terrorism?

HL Bhat
Delhi


II

Barkha Dutt is silent about lakhs of Hindus who were raped, killed and forced to run away from their birthplace. This shows that she is either myopic or does not care about Hindus. She should not be biased, rather she should be concerned more about the problems Kashmiris are facing today, whether they be Hindus, Muslims or Sikhs.

Dhiraj Kakkar
via e-mail


III

I believe the poor condition of the Kashmiris is due to politicians, terrorists and the army who make people suffer for their own twisted ends. Politicians say Kashmir is a part of India. But why are people so negative about Kashmiris. The people of Kashmir are being punished for being Kashmiris.

Sumaiya Rafiq
via e-mail


Twin strategy

Vikram Sood in Out of mind, out of sight (January 31) gives an insight into the security implications of the Ulfa’s activities. The Ulfa’s violence against innocent people can only be tackled by the twin strategy of improving development and forcefully tackling the insurgency.

Sanjay S
Delhi


Personal politics

Apropos of the editorial In search of the BJP (January 31), the changes in the BJP president’s team do not constitute a winning formula or display a long-term vision for the party’s revival. It is painful that the leadership of the country’s main Opposition should indulge in personal positioning games and cutting down challenges to their individual status without any attempt to mobilise the young talent in the country. If this continues, the BJP may be condemned to political irrelevance.

Ved Guliani
Hissar


II

It is ironical that the BJP that claims to be a party with a difference is trying to woo actress Shilpa Shetty just because she has earned fame and money on a TV show. Does it mean the BJP has become bankrupt and does not have the right candidates in its fold? It is well-known that people cannot always be fooled by publicity-hungry film stars just because they call themselves MPs or MLAs.

PP Talwar
via e-mail


Divisive categories

Apropos of the report Apex court notice to Centre on 27 p.c. quota (February 1), out of the 27.2 per cent reservation offered to the OBCs, only 16 per cent is occupied every year in IITs, IIMs and other higher education institutions. A study done by the IITs shows that 50 per cent of the IIT seats for SCs and STs remain vacant. The politicians just want to increase their vote-bank and make laws without knowing the facts and figures. The reservation policy is breaking our country into reserved and general categories.

Devashish Mamgain
Dehradun


Unsafe Noida

this refers to Jatin Gandhi’s report Noida is unsafe, shows Nithari (Jan. 27), it is sad that so much has happened due to lack of action by authorities in Nithari. Now some people are fanning the flames as they want to cash in on the sale and resale of properties. We need responsible management and reporting of such activities through the media.

Randhir Birdi
via e-mail


II

Nithari was ignored because these people are poor and do not have money to get the attention of the cops. If we need justice for everyone, we need to get rid of the corrupt police and some of our leaders ruling at the Centre.

Uma Heramb Singh
US


Future imperfect

Abhishek Singhvi in Tiger, tiger, burning dim (Jan. 31), truly stated that our natural resources and wildlife are fast vanishing and no one seems too worried about this. In fact, we do not have strict laws to prohibit crimes against nature. It is our duty to educate the masses regarding the seriousness of this issue. If we are not able to solve this problem now, our future will be bleak.

Saad Ullah Khan
Aligarh

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