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With reference to the editorial The nucl-ear fear factor (July 23), for a developing nation like India whose energy requirement is growing by leaps and bounds, it is difficult to imagine a sustainable and low-carbon energy future without nuclear power and renewable energy sources.

india Updated: Jul 25, 2013 00:36 IST

The government must reach out to people to allay N-safety fears
With reference to the editorial The nucl-ear fear factor (July 23), for a developing nation like India whose energy requirement is growing by leaps and bounds, it is difficult to imagine a sustainable and low-carbon energy future without nuclear power and renewable energy sources. With nuclear power, India would not have to rely on expensive fossil fuels that emit large volumes of carbon dioxide. However, the way the government handled the protests against the Kudankulam plant was callous. The government should have reached out to the people and assured them that the highest standards of safety regarding power generation and waste disposal will be maintained at the plant site. However, it’s never too late to do the right thing.
Ashok Ghosh, via email

Don’t let the pothole issue deepen
With reference to the report Roads crumble like cookies (July 22), it is appalling that year after year crores of rupees are spent on road maintenance and yet a short spell of rain causes them to cave in, bringing vehicular traffic to a grinding halt and resulting in immense loss of man-hours. It is no secret that the nexus between the contractors and civic agencies is to be blamed for this situation. It is high time contractors and engineers of municipal corporations were penalised for shoddy road work.
TS Murthy, via email

Abe has his work cut out
With reference to the editorial Land of the re-rising Sun (Our Take, July 23), Shinzo Abe’s landslide victory in the Japanese parliament’s upper house shows that the voters have given a go-ahead to Abenomics. In order to revive the world’s third largest economy, he needs to ensure that his policies get wider acceptance. Abe’s return augurs well for India as several infrastructure projects are being pursued in India with Japanese technical assistance. Moreover, an economically stronger Japan can reduce China’s dominance in the subcontinent.
Surajit Patnaik, Gurgaon

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