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Water crisis in DLF may end in June

The water woes of DLF residents are likely to end soon. The DLF management is about to complete the project of laying separate pipelines for uninterrupted water supply in Phase 1 and Phase 3.

india Updated: Feb 20, 2012 00:59 IST
HT Correspondent

The water woes of DLF residents are likely to end soon. The DLF management is about to complete the project of laying separate pipelines for uninterrupted water supply in Phase 1 and Phase 3.

Baljit Singh, manager, DLF management, said, “We understand the problems being faced by the residents. We have been working on the project for the past several months. We have nearly completed the work of laying new pipelines. But the work on an underground storage tank is yet to be completed. We are hopeful that the
project will be completed before June.”

The residents have been complaining to the management about the low pressure in the pipelines and erratic supply of water. The total water requirement of DLF City is nearly 16,000 kilo litres a day. The residents get supply of about 8,000 kilo litres water from Haryana Urban Development Authority. Besides, they have 54 registered borewells. But still they face the shortage of 4,000 kilo litres of water per day.

According to the management officials, in blocks G and D of Phase 1, about 780 metres new pipeline has been laid. Similarly in phase III, 500 metres pipeline is being laid. Besides, the management is constructing an underground water tank with 900 kilo litre capacity in block S of Phase 3 to deal with the acute shortage of water in the area.

Pramod Kumar, a resident of Phase 3, said, “It was very much required. Last year the management revised the maintenance charges to R2.5 per sq yard from R1, but it failed to provide basic facilities.”

“We have been complaining about the water problems to the management for the past several months. Finally, they understood our problem. We are hopeful that things will improve soon,” said Manish Malhotra, a resident of Phase.