What happened to 4,000 ?vacant? UPTU seats? | india | Hindustan Times
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What happened to 4,000 ?vacant? UPTU seats?

india Updated: Oct 31, 2006 01:36 IST
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WITH THE first semester examinations of the UP Technical University (UPTU) set to start from December, there is no news about the status of about 4,000-odd seats in engineering colleges across UP.

The re-counselling through which the vacant seats were to be filled has been postponed twice with private colleges challenging the order that stated that such seats were to be filled strictly on merit and with those candidates who took their UP State Entrance Examination (UPSEE). The re-counselling issue is pending in the court and to-date there is no knowledge whether the seats that are ‘officially vacant’ are indeed vacant still.

“The private colleges are a powerful body. Its members are well connected too. So, they indulge in bullying tactics and get away with it,” said a UPTU source.

The general assumption is that the private colleges wanted to make admissions against the existing vacancies on their own.

But then this is not the only instance of how the private colleges are riding roughshod over the directives of the state government as well as the UPTU. On August 3, this year Rajeev Kumar, secretary, technical education directed all technical colleges to admit candidates under the management quota strictly on merit. The colleges were also directed to issue prominent advertisements informing the candidates to apply within 21 days of the publication of the advertisement to the institute concerned, UP Technical University (UPTU) vice-chancellor (V-C) or an official nominated by the V-C.

What’s more, to make it more convenient for the candidates, the state government had decided that in case candidates were not able to get the application form, they could apply on a plain piece of paper mentioning their names, roll number and their rank in the UPSEE merit. An official of the UPTU nominated by the V-C was supposed to screen the merit list prepared by the colleges. But, the private colleges conveniently ignored the directives. “The colleges have always wanted to admit candidates through the management quota on their own as they make a huge profit in this manner. But, the big question is why is the state government is silent at the violation of its orders,” an official asked. Interestingly, the August directive was probably the fourth such missive to private colleges on the management quota. “It’s clear that the government too hardly wants to implement its own order for obvious reasons.”

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