What makes the cops keep SIMI leader?s surrender under wraps? | india | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Oct 20, 2017-Friday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

What makes the cops keep SIMI leader?s surrender under wraps?

WITH CHARGES as serious as treason and complicity in the serial bomb blasts, Students? Islamic Movement of India State president Mohd Aamir was always a dream catch. He is also the alleged mastermind of the March 16 riots in Kanpur.

india Updated: Jun 01, 2006 01:42 IST

WITH CHARGES as serious as treason and complicity in the serial bomb blasts, Students’ Islamic Movement of India State president Mohd Aamir was always a dream catch. He is also the alleged mastermind of the March 16 riots in Kanpur.

On April 25, this year the top militant, who eluded the security agencies for five years, quietly walked into a courtroom and surrendered in a case related to the Kanpur riots. The bearded and burly SIMI leader, who spent a year in a Bangladesh terror sanctuary, now languishes in barrack six of Kanpur jail. But let alone taking any action, the city police fiercely guard the development.  In view of their compulsions, the police have not endorsed the surrender in records, even after being informed by the court of the metropolitan magistrate (VI), where Aamir surrendered. Nor did they attempt to seek remand of Aamir, who, if interrogated, is certain to reveal startling details of the terror network in the State and beyond. Also, no one is forthcoming on the details of his surrender.

Investigations by HT reveal the police actually helped Aamir surrender in the case (crime no 20/2001) registered at Becongunj police station. As Aamir was one of the 37 accused, there were chances of his surrender going unnoticed, a thinking that worked perfectly.

In three other cases pending against him at Chamangunj, Bajaria and Swaroop Nagar, he is the prime accused. In these cases, Aamir is charged with treachery and being the prime conspirator behind twin blasts in Arya Nagar.

Hizbul Mujahideen militants Mumtaz Ahmed, Wasif Syed and Ghulam Gilani, who were perpetrators of the blasts, had confessed in court that Aamir sent them for receiving training in bomb-making across the border.

On their return, he made available all explosive and other equipment they used to trigger off the blast. Aamir shot into infamy with the controversial Ikhwan conference he organised in 1999 at Halim College.

The conference, addressed by Hamas leader Sheikh Yasin, who has since been slain, and Qazi Hussain Ahmed, chief of Jamat-e-Islami, Pakistan, served as a launching pad for budding ultras. As many as 150 boys from all over North India were recruited and dispatched to Muzaffarabad for training. A year later, when the State was rocked by a series of blasts at Kanpur, Lucknow, Faizabad and Agra, Aamir emerged as the key figure.

Several top HM cadres were harboured by him. One of them Kala Kashmiri, gunned down in the Poonch sector by the STF, had imparted training in bomb-making techniques at a Babupurwa house rented by Aamir. “He’s the repository of critical information. He is the missing link the agencies have always been looking for,” said an Intelligence source once associated with SIMI-related operations.

“The way the Kanpur police have responded to the surrender and acted in its aftermath is absolutely shocking for us,” he added. Source said on the day of his surrender, he went alone dressed in typical above ankle pyjama and below knee kurta.  The non-bailable warrant issued in the case came in handy in the surrender. Technically, the ‘pairokar’ should have had informed the Becongunj police and the APO so that the surrender could have been opposed, but nothing as such was done. As a matter of fact, the information was concealed by the Becongunj police. Station officer DP Shukla denied the surrender vehemently.

His riposte was: not a single surrender had taken place in this case in the last six months. But the court records belie his claim and bring the role of the city police under the scanner.