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'What's so exciting about my life?"

Looks like Bollywood directors are running out of original ideas. What else explains the current craze about using real life incidents as plots for movies.

india Updated: Jun 14, 2006 16:58 IST

Looks like Bollywood directors are running out of original ideas. What else explains the current craze about using real life incidents as plots for movies. While directors might seem satisfied with their newfound treasure of ideas, the people whose lives are to be imitated on screen don't seem pleased though.

Ask Pakistani actress Meera, whose life has been chosen as a plot for director Param Gill's movie. The actress says. "It's not right to make a film on my life without my permission.. No one has any right to do so. I think I am yet to cross many hurdles and establish myself in the industry. I find it too early to portray my story on the silver screen. The way I have entered in the film industry, I am confident that I will reach the top one day. Even after that if someone decides to make a film on me, my permission and acknowledgement is must." Furious Meera is now taking a legal action against Gill.

Well Meera is not the only one, sexy model Carol Gracias, who was in news recently for her "wardrobe malfunction" also has a movie being made on her. Madhur Bandarkar is making a flick that would deal wit the subject of wardrobe malfunction. Carol, though, finds his attempt as futile and dry. Says she, "I don't know what's so exciting about the subject and the movie. If it happens with anyone, it is unfortunate .It is not done deliberately or for publicity.. I don't know what message this film will convey?"

And it is not just celebrities who have been the chosen ones for movie plots. A film on rape victim Imraana, who was disallowed to stay with her husband after she was raped by her father-in-law, was met with severe objections.

Politicians have also not been spared. Abu Asim Azmi, a Rajya Sabha member of Samajwadi Party from Maharasthra has just knocked the door of Supreme Court for distortion of his image in a book and a film based on the book. Says his lawyer, Dr. Nafis Ahmed Siddiqui, "Abu Asmi has been portrayed as a traitor in a book titled Black Friday and obviously the film which has been made based on the book must be having similar portrayal. Though the film has already been challenged and it's hearing is going on, we want to raise our problem in Court now. This kind of portrayal about anybody in either film or book is violation of his fundamental right to live a dignified life. No one has right to make a film on anyone without the consultation and approval of the person concerned. I hope Supreme Court may end up the controversy with some guidelines."

It seems that Bollywood is ready for another set of controversies. The implicit targeting of models, politicians and celebrities by daring directors has surely hit the hornet's nest. As audience we can only say "lets wait and watch"!