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When Mush comes to shove

But Musharraf has shown that even in adversity, he has not lost his sense of humour. “I am the strongest proponent of human rights,” he assured Jemima.

india Updated: Feb 18, 2008 20:52 IST

Reports of rigging may be enough to make many in Pakistan see red. But not Jemima Goldsmith, former spouse of cricketer-politician Imran Khan. She is seeing shades of brown. It would appear that shortly before Pakistan went to the polls on Monday, the General and the pneumatically buoyant Ms Goldsmith had a little tete-a-tete. Did the former Mrs Khan quiz Mr Musharraf about the bloody course of Pakistan politics? No, she was disconcerted by the General’s brown business suit, his brown penny loafers and his touched-up black hair with artful shades of grey at the temples.

Now dear old Mush, always eager to cut a dash with the ladies, seems to have opened up with unusual candour to the lady. Could it be that he wants to make a clean breast of things with a view to the writing on the wall? Or could it be that the poor man’s nerves are so shot to bits that he has been reduced to a gabbling wreck? “I will win the maximum number of seats,” he claimed grandly, but added that he did not know whether his party could form a government. After projecting a Bismarckian image, the strongman weeps on Jemima’s shapely shoulders that the West did not let him press charges against his political opponents. Waspishly he whines that the West thought the late Benazir was the future of Pakistan.

But Mush has shown that even in adversity, he has not lost his sense of humour. “I am the strongest proponent of human rights,” he assured Jemima. Never mind what the judiciary and the press thinks of that. But the General and Jemima certainly have a thing or two in common. Both have a knack of keeping themselves in the news.