Where are bedtime stories? | india | Hindustan Times
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Where are bedtime stories?

Modern technology is depriving kids of the bed time stories, who now prefer to watch TV or listen to music.

india Updated:

TV, computers and DVDs are not only cutting into the amount of time kids used to spend playing in the outdoors, but as it turns out, also that time when parents tucked them into bed with a story.

A new survey has found that modern technology has kids hooked on to such an extent that nearly half of the kids questioned would rather watch TV or listen to music, than spend time on a bedtime story.

As a part of the survey, parenting website raisingkids.co.uk, covered more than 1,000 parents of children aged up to ten.

The researchers found that though 97 per cent of parents were aware that reading before bedtime helped in a child's development, only 47 percent took the time to read a story to their kids.

Child psychologist Dr Pat Spungin, founder of raisingkids.co.uk, said that earlier studies had shown that reading was important as it not only enhanced a child’s vocabulary, but also improves their creativity, reading and writing skills.

“Bedtime stories help set up a positive attitude to the written word. It extends their vocabulary, makes them like books and makes them want to read. The legacy is that it turns into a reading habit, with 38 per cent of children going on to read for themselves before bed,” the Daily Mail quoted Dr Spungin, as saying.

“This is a healthy routine to get into as it will improve their creativity, reading and writing skills, not to mention help them to relax and sleep better,” Dr Spungin added.

The survey also found that when it comes to parents themselves, fathers are significantly less likely to read aloud a story to their kids than mothers.

As for how much time parents take out for bedtime stories, well the results of the survey showed that 46 per cent spend less than ten minutes per night, while only 9 per cent spend at least half an hour reading to their kids.