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Where doctors themselves turn patients

Startling revelations have come up in a first of its kind survey done upon junior doctors that says long and irregular work hours and excessive patient load has turned many of the junior doctors into patients.

india Updated: Jun 06, 2010 17:03 IST
HT Correspondent

Startling revelations have come up in a first of its kind survey done upon junior doctors of the CSM Medical University 'country' first residential medical university. The survey says long and irregular work hours and excessive patient load has turned many of the junior doctors into patients.

Intoxicants are jr docs' best friends

1. Over 27 per cent junior doctors are anxiety prone.

2. Over 24 per cent consume liquor or tobacco to relieve tension.

3. About 13 per cent of them are under depression.

4. Few even contemplated suicide.

"In all 11 per cent of the juniors surveyed were habitual of taking alcohol, while 94 per cent confessed to taking tobacco or other such products at some point of time to relieve work stress," said Dr Samir Mishra who conducted the survey upon 77 junior doctors along with Dr Vinod Jain and Dr Sandip Tiwari.

The survey was done in March with over 20 questions given to each junior doctor who had already completed one year of hospital job. They were asked to reply to the questionnaire and then were interviewed personally by a team comprising senior residents Dr Abhishek Saraf, Dr Anubhav and Dr Shruti.

Among those interviewed 52 were from clinical departments and 25 from non-clinical departments. The clinical departments include Orthopedics, General Surgery, Gynaecology and emergency unit. While Microbiology, Pathology, Anatomy and Physiology constitute the non-clinical departments.

"Surprisingly depression was more among non-clinical department residents while anxiety was common among those working in clinical departments. This is linked to the excessive workload for the ones working in clinical departments since they need to work round-the-clock in emergency," said Dr Samir Mishra.

He said the cause of depression in non-clinical departments could be long working hours where residents usually have to conduct lab tests that take hours together.