Which party is free of pimp culture? | india | Hindustan Times
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Which party is free of pimp culture?

Vir Sanghvi's piece titled "Pimps, fixers & tentwallahs" again confirmed his deep-rooted bias. He needs the smallest opening to train his guns on a party he obviously doesn't like. Small wonder he thinks the Rahul Mahajan episode as being symptomatic of the general decline in the BJP culture. Surely, he doesn't need to be reminded that parties like the Congress and the Samajwadi Party have traditionally had a surfeit of fixers and continue to patronise them.

india Updated: Jun 05, 2006 18:05 IST

Mr Vir Sanghvi's edit page piece on Sunday (June 4) titled "Pimps, fixers & tentwallahs" again confirmed his deep-rooted biases. He needs the smallest opening to train his guns on a party he obviously doesn't like.

Small wonder he thinks the Rahul Mahajan episode as being symptomatic of the general decline in the BJP's culture ("More damaging is what the incident tell us of the BJP's culture") when there can be no link between the two -- not by a long shot.

The indiscretions of a young man, his capers with drugs, or the bad company he keeps is a problem which confronts many families the world over. In fact, should Mr Sanghvi do some serious soul-searching, his own youth (or middle age) may not have been a model of virtue.

The writer's self-righteous indignation on why the late Pramod Mahajan allowed his Safdarjung residence to "become the headquarters of an extended family of "pimps, fixers, and tentwallahs" also smacks of intellectual hypocrisy at its worst.

Surely, Mr Sanghvi doesn't need to be reminded that parties like the Congress and the Samajwadi Party have traditionally had a surfeit of pimps and fixers and continue to. Which political party doesn't? And at what point of time in history did politics become a playground of the good, the upright and incorruptible?

Pimps and fixers come in various shapes and sizes; even their tools of trade vary. Some are low lifers who pimp and prostrate with a mealy mouth; others better born with the elevated power of the pen.

In the eyes of God (whom Mr Sangvi too will someday have to confront), there is no difference. "Gotta serve somebody," as the old Bob Dylan song goes.