Will PM take a re-look into '84 riots? asks Sidhu | india | Hindustan Times
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Will PM take a re-look into '84 riots? asks Sidhu

Navjot Singh Sidhu counters the prime minister for his promise to take a "re-look" into the probe into the 2002 Gujarat riots.

india Updated: Dec 12, 2007 17:21 IST

Cricketer-turned-politician Navjot Singh Sidhu on Wednesday countered Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for his promise to take a "re-look" into the probe into the 2002 communal riots in Gujarat if Congress comes to power by asking whether he will give a similar assurance regarding the 1984 anti-Sikh riots in Delhi.

"If you want to re-open 2002 riot cases it's fine. But, what about the 1984 Sikh riots in Delhi where more than 5,000 Sikhs were killed and not a single FIR has been registered," Sidhu, a BJP MP, asked at a news conference here.

Showering encomiums on Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi, Sidhu said his following has grown in the state and "Five years down the line, people in Gujarat will want their children to be like Modi."

Asked for his comments on Singh's remark that L K Advani was annointed as BJP's Prime Ministerial candidate to ward off any threat from Modi , Sidhu said "The fact is that the PM recognises the strength of Modi and his imminent victory."

"Modi is not a threat to the BJP, but is an asset," he added. In Sidhu's view, " the Prime Minister has partly talked on facts and partly on fantasy."

Sidhu exuded confidence that the people of Gujarat will vote BJP and Modi back to power for all the good work he has done. "In Gujarat, people will not show their resentment against the BJP-ruled government, as normally people do after a government has completed its five years of rule in a particular state," Sidhu remarked.

Sidhu equated the opposition Congress in Gujarat "as a rudderless ship" and that it was leaderless in the state.

Claiming that several factions existed within the Congress in Gujarat, he said "if the Congress declares their chief ministerial candidate, at least seven different factions are sure to emerge."