Withdrawal of US troops from Iraq is a wrong move | india | Hindustan Times
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Withdrawal of US troops from Iraq is a wrong move

With reference to the editorial A welcome homecoming (Our Take, September 3), the withdrawal of about 100,000 American soldiers from Iraq since Barack Obama took office may lead to the resumption of sectarian violence in the country.

india Updated: Sep 05, 2010 22:24 IST

Withdrawal of US troops from Iraq is a wrong move
With reference to the editorial A welcome homecoming (Our Take, September 3), the withdrawal of about 100,000 American soldiers from Iraq since Barack Obama took office may lead to the resumption of sectarian violence in the country. Once that happens, it will be difficult to curb it again. However, one can understand Obama's compulsions, he has too many problems (a moribund economy and a messy war in Afghanistan) to contend with at the moment.
R Narayanan, via email

Teaching it wrong
Shivam Vij, through his article Abolish Teacher's Day (September 3), portrays teachers as some kind of monsters. Neither have teachers ever claimed to be the avatars of goddess Saraswati nor have students ever treated them that way.
Viniti Gupta, via email

II
Vij has painted all teachers with the same brush. It is not justified. Nobody will deny that the role of a teacher in shaping a student's personality is crucial. Abolishing Teacher's Day is not the best solution to the problems that Vij has mentioned in the article.
Dev Gulati, via email

Keep a watch on the dragon
The report Expert: China Gilgit gambit is strategic (September 4) should be an eye-opener for India. It's astonishing that while we have helped Pakistan flood victims, Islamabad continues to devise new strategies to harm India. Instead of denying Chinese presence in Gilgit to cover up its failure, the Ministry of Defence should put pressure on China to keep out of PoK.
Deepjot Thukral, Ambala

Rahul Gandhi as PM? Not yet
This refers to Samar Halarnkar's article Is Rahul ready? (Maha Bharat, September 2). Rajiv Gandhi and Sonia Gandhi entered politics out of necessity, not choice. But the same is not true for Rahul Gandhi. He doesn't yet have the requisite experience to assume the prime minister's office. He should spend some more time to understand India's real problems and work for the party. He should realise that it's one thing to be considered worthy of a post and quite another to actually deliver.
B M Singh, Amritsar

Pawar missing in action
With reference to the editorial India's empty underbelly (Our Take, August 2), the Supreme Court has no business to interfere in the functioning of the executive. Having said that, one must add that even Agriculture Minister Sharad Pawar's failure to acknowledge the problem of rotting foodgrain is equally surprising. He seems adamant in his refusal to distribute grain among the poor. It seems Pawar is more interested in cricket than taking a call on the distribution of rotting foodgrains.
Krishna Balraj Sahay, Kodarma

A correct analysis
Kanwal Sibal in A lose-lose situation (September 2) makes a genuine assessment of the turmoil in Kashmir and also rightly identifies its causes. It's true that Kashmiris take advantage of New Delhi's efforts to preserve the autonomy of their state. Also, the pro-Pakistan separatists in the state are misleading the youth. All this is further widening the gap between Kashmir and India. The Centre should take action against those who come in the way of restoring peace and order in Kashmir.
J L Ganjoo, Delhi