Woman power in Durga worship | india | Hindustan Times
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Woman power in Durga worship

During pujas, it is the men who collect donations, put up pandals and manage the finances while demure women in crisp yellow sarees cut fruits for the deity, light agarbathis and let their husbands run the show.

india Updated: Sep 19, 2006 03:19 IST

Ranchi: During pujas, it is the men who collect donations, put up pandals and manage the finances while demure women in crisp yellow sarees cut fruits for the deity, light agarbathis and let their husbands run the show. But why should they, when Durga is a manifestation of womanhood and their fiery resolve? And so, a puja committee in Jamshedpur decided to let their men stay at home while they organised puja celebrations.

“The Alakananda Complex Puja Committee was started in 1999 after our women thought they weren’t doing enough. Even when they offered to pitch in, they weren’t trusted with important work. Some if them thought they were being ill-treated. That’s when we decided to come forward and shoulder the responsibility of organising pujas,” said committee president Amita Das.

Committee vice-president Sunanda Dalal said, “Our members collect donations from nearby complexes after they are done with their household work. This year, we have sought donations of Rs 501, though they can pay more if they wish to,” she said. Committee secretary Rekha Bangabash said they hold a general body meeting before pujas every year and members are assigned responsibilities. “The members arrange idols and puja material and supervise the bhog,” said Bangabash.

Animesh Bisoee

Ganguly gets a new coach

Kolkata: Mastan Malli Babu, a 32-year old graduate of the Indian Institute of Management, Kolkata, is just back after scaling Mt Devali in Alaska, the last of the seven highest summits in the world.

He now has another job on hand and that is not any easier. Babu is all set to coach Sourav Ganguly, the ex-captain of the Indian team, on “fitness” and “strategy” which can work wonders in a game, especially if the pitch is tough and the terrain is hostile. Ask Ganguly and he will tell you how desperately he needs that.

Malli and Ganguly will meet at IIM-K in a couple of days, where the mountaineer will teach Ganguly how to keep his mind calm and body fit.

“The ex-Indian captain has faced tremendous hostility, especially from top sports administrators of the country. What is coming in the way of his game is probably his temperament and lack of strategy. Let’s hope I can help him with his troubles.” Babu told the Hindustan Times.

Nandini Guha