Writers still doing job with honesty: Gulzar | india | Hindustan Times
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Writers still doing job with honesty: Gulzar

POET, SCRIPTWRITER, lyricist, film director Gulzar is one of the most versatile artistes to ink an indelible mark on Indian cinema and literature. He has given us some of the most lyrical moments of celluloid and has conceived some of the finest writings in literature. Immaculately dressed in starched white kurta-pyjama and yellow jootis he radiates a magical presence?like that of his legendary movies?--?Mere Apne?, ?Khushboo?, ?Kinara?, ?Ijazat?, Machis...

india Updated: Aug 26, 2006 14:42 IST

POET, SCRIPTWRITER, lyricist, film director Gulzar is one of the most versatile artistes to ink an indelible mark on Indian cinema and literature. He has given us some of the most lyrical moments of celluloid and has  conceived some of the finest writings in literature. Immaculately dressed in starched white kurta-pyjama and yellow jootis he radiates a magical presence—like that of his legendary movies—--‘Mere Apne’, ‘Khushboo’, ‘Kinara’,  ‘Ijazat’, Machis...

Showering eulogies on the GenNext, the acclaimed writer said, “I admire the current breed because of their multidimensional composition. They are very transparent and are bereft of any false illusions or social hypocrisies.” Gulzar was in Bhopal on Friday to chair the Urdu poetry session of the Sahitya Akademi at Bharat Bhavan.

Acknowledging that the contemporary crop had re-defined the intellectual apparatus he said, “In my times we used to be dependent only on books for honing our internal knowledge. Today, the knowledge trove can be exploited simply by clicking the wired mouse on the computer. There is nothing wrong in this phenomenon. You have to understand their co-existence.”

“I would say, the current generation has a higher IQ and we have become dependent on their prowess. It is an age-old tradition that parents try to superimpose their own thoughts on their prodigies. We have to look at our own antennas,” he told the Hindustan Times.

On the literary landscape he said, “I feel that the man of letter is perhaps the only honest fragment in today’s world. A writer is still doing his job with honesty, meeting his commercial demands and the writing sphere is unblemished by the taints of corruption.”

Conceding that reading proclivities have plunged he said, “This has not hampered progress. Print world will always survive because it is the food for electronic world.”

On plagiarism he said, “This existed earlier also but since the globe has shrunk, influences are bound to increase. The sources of expressions have increased.”

Most of Gulzar’s movies are character or relationship-driven. “Yes, human being is such a universal phenomenon.  Relations form the fulcrum of any progressive society.”

Quizzed on how his creative juices start flowing, he said, “Writing is just like any another job. Most of my ideas assimilate while I am travelling.”

Despite his clear insistence that the conversation should restrict to a literary arena, a question cropped on his lyrical renditions to Vishal Bharadwaj’s movie ‘Omkara’ — how close was this movie to Shakespearee’s Othello? “ ‘Omkara’ is not an Othello. Neither was ‘Maqbool’ a Macbeth. It is just a thin plot line.”

Lastly, what role did he feel most comfortable in — writer, lyricist or director? “ Itt’s like asking a person which role does he like most — as a son, husband or father”, he said in a jocular vein.