Writing a new chapter in restoring Delhi’s heritage | india | Hindustan Times
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Writing a new chapter in restoring Delhi’s heritage

The report Writer who restored Delhi’s heritage (October 19) should be an eye-opener for the Delhi government.

india Updated: Oct 21, 2009 20:11 IST

Writing a new chapter in restoring Delhi’s heritage
The report Writer who restored Delhi’s heritage (October 19) should be an eye-opener for the Delhi government. The dedication of Ajeet Cour towards preserving the artefacts she found during the construction of DDA’s sports club near the Siri Fort auditorium should encourage others to come forward to preserve our historical sites and, thereby, the city’s rich heritage. With the Commonwealth Games round the corner, and keeping in mind the government’s habit of making excuses for its inability to act on time, such attempts would boost Delhi’s tourism industry and help restore its cultural identity.
K. Venkataraman, Delhi

No longer on the backfoot
The stand taken by Prem Shankar Jha in It’s a dim sum game (October 21) makes us ponder over the sovereign status of India. While it’s true that China’s past record bears testimony to its roguish behaviour, it is no excuse for our spineless foreign policy. Arunachal Pradesh is an integral part of India and it is our prerogative as to who or what we allow within our borders, and the Dalai Lama’s visit should go ahead as planned. Instead of running away from what’s staring us in the face, we should be ready to face up to the reality of Chinese belligerence, to show China the difference between 1962 and the present day.
Amit Rahul, Delhi

II
Arunachal Pradesh is an integral part of India and since the Dalai Lama has been legally allowed to stay in India, he has a legitimate right to visit any part of the country. If India, at this stage, opposes his visit in any way, it will only amount to our acceptance of the Chinese claim over what is our territory. The government should ignore Chinese threats, as they are not
even worth a response.
Bhupal Singh, Australia

The solution and its problems
I agree with Sitaram Yechury’s view in Darkness at noon (Left Hand Drive, October 20) that an increase in public investment would lead to inclusive growth. But what Yechury seems to have forgotten is that public investment has its own set of problems.
For example, between the 1960s and the 1990s, when public sector growth was at its peak, it did not foster human development in the manner the government expected it to. If public investment alone could solve all the social and economic problems of a state, then can Yechury explain why West Bengal still lags behind many other states?
Bidyut Basu, Kolkata

II
Sitaram Yechury’s suggestion of expanding public investments to generate new jobs, promoting social and economic development and ensuring food security is well-meant. But if the Left Front has the solution to the problems that plague our country, why did it refuse to align with the Centre and work towards bringing about the much-needed change? The writer should realise that as long as ideology is not translated into action, India will not progress.
R.K. Malhotra, Delhi

A cut above the rest
Mukesh Ambani’s gesture of taking a paycut will send a positive message to other Chief Executive Officers (CEO) (Cheque it out, The Pundit, October 19). The disparity in salaries has always led to problems among senior management and junior-level employees. Ambani’s decision will put an end to the debate on how much is too much when it comes to a CEO’s salary. This should encourage other top-level employees in Reliance Industries and other organisations to shed greed.
Neha Shankar, Varanasi