?Yeah! Metro style comes from small towns? | india | Hindustan Times
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?Yeah! Metro style comes from small towns?

?MOST OF the fashion in the metros comes from smaller cities. Yes. It does,? said Farooq Shaikh giving his dishavelled hair a punchy pat to say it all! He discussed Chikan charm, Lakhnawi tehzeeb and how well they gel with the city?s colour and complexion. Nothing! You just stop and listen to him when the Shaikh talks.

india Updated: Aug 14, 2006 00:23 IST
Rahul Ray

“MOST OF the fashion in the metros comes from smaller cities. Yes. It does,” said Farooq Shaikh giving his dishavelled hair a punchy pat to say it all!
He discussed Chikan charm, Lakhnawi tehzeeb and how well they gel with the city’s colour and complexion. Nothing! You just stop and listen to him when the Shaikh talks.

He was in the city to attend the Convocation Day function at Asma Hussain Institute of Fashion Technology on Sunday.

About fashion world’s neck-n-neck squeeze for attention, he said, “Failures should not dishearten as one can tap international buyers on the Net. With plethora of opportunities, subjective creativity matters. Akin to conveyor belts, one in the fashion world should always move forward.

Oscars should not be the criterion for good cinema, rather it should be vice versa, said Farooq Shaikh.

One who studied law and had a brief stint with Indian People’s Theatre Association before plunging into the genre of parallel or New India cinema, he was in the city to attend.

Dwelling on alleged ‘distortion’ of stories like in ‘Devdas’, he categorically stated that everyone was entitled to freedom of expression. “It is for the public to judge the end product. Besides, Saigal aficionados find fault with Dilip Kumar. Similar is Shahrukh’s case. Twenty years down the line, the wheel will turn another cycle,” he said.

The star, whose works have the signature of stalwarts like Satyajit Ray, Muzaffar Ali and Hrishikesh Mukherjee, went ga-ga over multiplexes that are rolling out interesting cinematic trends and wooing the youth.

Reacting to his sabbatical from the celluloid world, he asserted, “I do not want to face flak for essaying a nondescript role. I will sign on the dotted line only if the character is interesting and the part does not violate my sensibilities.”

The ‘Tumhari Amrita’ and ‘Aapki Soniya’ artiste is saddened over the dearth of good theatre writers. “The popular ones are translators. It is distressing that Lucknow and Hyderabad— places comfortable with Urdu— are dormant as regards plays. With government plans caught in red tape, the private sector has to come forward and provide a platform to the stage.”

Of late, Farooq has taken a liking to Premchand. He has also been an avid reader of Shelley, Bryon, Keates and Frost.

Earlier, the Institute distributed certificates to pass-outs and awards to the toppers. The students who were awarded were: Gulfishan Anjum, Shweta Bharadwaj, Sant Lal Verma, Alka Rai, Nishu Agarwal, Asma Abdeen, Preeti Oberoi, Shivani Mehrotra, Arshi Fatima, Kajal Lakhmani, Sana Arif, Gunjan Shrivastav and Shweta Agarwal.