9 cases of measles surface in Neemuch | indore | Hindustan Times
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9 cases of measles surface in Neemuch

Nine cases of measles have surfaced in Palsoda block of Neemuch district, following which a team of the World Health Organisation visited the area to take stock of the situation.

indore Updated: Aug 11, 2015 18:37 IST
HT Correspondent

Nine cases of measles have surfaced in Palsoda block of Neemuch district, following which a team of the World Health Organisation visited the area to take stock of the situation.

Those affected by the contagious disease are children between the age of two and nine years. The surfacing of new cases in the area has sent the district healthcare department into a tizzy as the government had launched a vaccination drive to protect children from the disease.

So far, a health department medical team led by block medical officer Dr MS Chouhan has visited Dhamniya, Chadoli villages, in addition a team of experts from the WHO in Ratlam who rushed to the area to take stock of the situation.

When contacted, chief medical and health officer Dr KK Vaskale said the health department was surveying the village and collecting blood samples of villagers who were in contact with the kids suffering from the disease.

"The department is trying to ascertain from where the children got infected," he said.

Measles, also known as Rubeola and caused by the paramyxovirus, is an infection of the respiratory system and is transmitted via discharge from the nose, mouth or throat of infected persons.

Health workers from the area blame superstition among villagers for the recent outbreak as measles is seen as “Mata” (goddess) and a number of them avoid vaccinating their childred for fear of upsetting their goddess.

As per the health department, a child needs at least three vaccinations to be safe from measles. Under the government's immunisation drive, only nine-month-old children are vaccinated against the disease. However, unlike private centres, government health centres do not offer MMR, a combined vaccine that protects children against three separate illnesses - measles, mumps and rubella.

Fresh cases of measles have thrown in question the government's much-touted vaccination drive.