Indore historian sets up an antique studio to save treasures of the past

  • Divya Raje Bhonsale, Hindustan Times, Indore
  • Updated: Apr 26, 2015 18:05 IST

In the age of tablets, iPods and smartphones, when technology has become the way of life, Indore historian Rajendra Singh has taken up the cudgels to save the treasures of the past.

Singh has collected antiques, some of them 200-years-old, and set up a one-of-its-kind studio by converting a part of his house.

“The antique studio, which offers a sneak peek into the world of antiques, targets the young and aims at spreading awareness regarding preservation of antiques,” Singh told Hindustan Times.

“From a 200-hundred years old entrance door of a temple to a century-old electric bell, the antiques in my studio will take visitors back in time,” he said.

The antiques were collected by the historian from several parts of central India.

“Everything has been collected over a period of time from different places. For instance, I have two huge wooden doors with beautiful carvings on them. These were brought at a time when they were being demolished,” he said, emphasizing on the need to save these antiques “that are a part of our heritage.”

According to him the technique and technology behind these antiques -- carvings on furniture or machines -- is something that is dying out.

“It should be our topmost priority to save these masterpieces. The youngsters can be inspired by these antiques and can preserve them for future generations,” he said.

Singh has etched out brief history of all the products to further encourage the youth. “I labeled each antique with its time period, its usage, the materials used in making it, etc.”

Apart from the furniture, the antique studio also houses a gas stove from World War II that works on petrol, an electric bell, paan-daans, lamps and several paintings.

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