Indore man saves life of many by donating organs | indore | Hindustan Times
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Indore man saves life of many by donating organs

It took just one strong decision by the family of 42-year-old Sunil Devkar, a small time businessman from Madhya Pradesh’s Burhanpur, to become a life saviour for several people across the state.

indore Updated: Nov 19, 2016 10:59 IST
Madhya Pradesh

Five organs of Devkar, who was declared brain dead on Wednesday at Indore’s MY Hospital, gave a new lease of life to over three people across the state.(HT file)

It took just one strong decision by the family of 42-year-old Sunil Devkar, a small time businessman from Madhya Pradesh’s Burhanpur, to become a life saviour for several people across the state.

Five organs of Devkar, who was declared brain dead on Wednesday at Indore’s MY Hospital, gave a new lease of life to over three people across the state.

His liver was administered to a patient in Bhopal on Friday while his kidneys went to two other patients in Indore. Eyes and skin were donated to eye and skin banks in the city.

For the first time, doctors in the state attempted to donate the heart to a hospital in Chennai but the idea was dropped as there was no flight available at that time.

It was reported that the Devkar family had contacted Muskaan foundation as they had decided to donate organs before undergoing any kind of counselling.

“In the past, people are now aware and wish to benefit and leave an impact on other people’s life,” said Jitu Bagnani, a member of the foundation, which works on cases of organ donation with Indore Organ Donation Society. The society was established in February 2014.

A green corridor, created by the Indore administration, was the city’s 13th successful cadaver donation while it was Bhopal’s maiden.

The green corridor is a special travel route for speedy transportation of harvested organs. In cases where the recipient is in another city, it enables an ambulance to reach the airport without any traffic problems, from where it is airlifted.

“We realised that a single window clearance was required in order to actively carry out organ harvesting as we have severe time crunch and cannot go to every authority to seek a clearance,” said Sanjay Dixit, the joint director of Indore Organ Donation Society.

Role of divisional commissioner Sanjay Dubey came handy as the entire concept of organ donation society was his brain child.

“I would read about the commendable work by hospitals in Chennai and Delhi and would ask myself if we can do similar kind of work here as well,” said Dubey. “We wanted to maintain transparency as organ donation is a very critical matter. So, we would maintain a recipient waiting list on our website and make a decision only if the receiver met all the norms required by us,” said Dubey.

ORGAN DONATION PROCESS

Doctors report that a patient is brain dead

Get certified by a team of doctors who do a total of 13 tests to declare the patient brain dead. The tests include dolls head eye movement, corneal reflex, change in pupils size, Gag reflex, Apnea amongst others

These declarations are done by a team which is known as the ‘Brain stem death Certification board’. It comprises of the Medical administrative officer, Authorize specialist, Neurologists surgeon or physician and medical officer who was treating the patient.

Once the board approves that the patient is brain dead a re-check is done again after six hours

Care is also taken to see whether the patient had cancer, diabetes and other diseases which are said to change the manner in which organs function

Also if the patient is above 60 years heart is not harvested from the body

After this the team informs National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organisation (NOTTO) which sends messages all around the country requesting for a list of patients who require urgent transplant

Based on the physical proximity with the donor the decision is made