Lack of vital equipment caused child’s death at Indore hospital | indore | Hindustan Times
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Lack of vital equipment caused child’s death at Indore hospital

A month after two children succumbed at MY Hospital in Indore due to the accidental administration of a lethal dose of nitrous oxide, a shocking revelation of alleged medical negligence has come forth as the prime reason for one of the deaths. children die at MY Hospital, nitrous oxide given to child at Indore hospital, medical negligence, at

indore Updated: Jun 29, 2016 16:24 IST
All the four ABG machines at MY Hospital were out of order and the toddler’s life could have been saved if the machines were functional.
All the four ABG machines at MY Hospital were out of order and the toddler’s life could have been saved if the machines were functional. (Shankar Mourya/HT file)

A month after two children succumbed at MY Hospital in Indore due to the accidental administration of a lethal dose of nitrous oxide, a shocking revelation of alleged medical negligence has come forth as the prime reason for one of the deaths.

Documents have revealed that arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis tests were conducted at a private medical institution while the victim, 15-month-old Rajveer, was battling for life at MY Hospital. The child’s parents had to constantly shuttle between the two hospitals due to this, resulting in Rajveer’s treatment getting delayed. Eventually, the child died.

ABG tests are vital for checking the oxygen level in a patient’s body. A drop means that the patient is in a critical condition, and requires urgent medical attention.

In Rajveer’s case, his parents had to rush to the private hospital frequently because all the four ABG machines at MY Hospital were out of order. “I had to go to a private hospital more than three times to obtain these results,” said Balu Prajapat, Rajveer’s father.

ABG machines are still non-functional

The machines are still non-functional, and could prove fatal to more patients if they are not restored immediately. The ABG machine is an important instrument at operation theatres.

According to sources, the toddler’s life could have been saved if the ABG machines were functional.

They would have also helped doctors realise that the nitrous oxide and oxygen pipelines had been interchanged.

Rajveer’s parents have alleged that while the boy died on May 28, the hospital administration deliberately tried to hide the matter for a day to avoid media attention.

The hospital administration and the director of medical education are yet to table their reports on the toddler deaths.

A petition was filed before the Indore bench of the Madhya Pradesh high court earlier this month, and the documents were produced before it. The high court chief justice will hear the matter on Wednesday.