Over half of the diabetes cases go undiagnosed, says expert in Indore | indore | Hindustan Times
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Over half of the diabetes cases go undiagnosed, says expert in Indore

“India has the largest number of diabetes patients, of which 80 per cent have uncontrolled sugar levels that make them susceptible to cardiac problems. More than half of the diabetes cases go undiagnosed for a long time because people don’t go for routine check-ups,” said Dr Sandeep Jhulka, an Indore-based endocrinologist, here on Thursday

indore Updated: Nov 10, 2016 20:50 IST
Dr Jhukla said that people around the world are spending approximately 673 billion dollars in health care related to diabetes.
Dr Jhukla said that people around the world are spending approximately 673 billion dollars in health care related to diabetes.(Representational image)

“India has the largest number of diabetes patients, of which 80 per cent have uncontrolled sugar levels that make them susceptible to cardiac problems. More than half of the diabetes cases go undiagnosed for a long time because people don’t go for routine check-ups,” said Dr Sandeep Jhulka, a city-based endocrinologist, here on Thursday.

He was addressing a press conference held to announce a marathon to be held from Nehru Stadium to Industry House in Indore on Sunday, one day ahead of the World Diabetes Day, with an intention of creating awareness on the disease.

The marathon will be flagged off by Pushpendra Rathod, director general of police with Border Security Forces (BSF), and Dr Sanjay Londhe, president of Indian Medical Association in Indore. The participants will be accompanied by around 300 BSF personnel.

At the press meet, Dr Jhukla said that people around the world are spending approximately 673 billion dollars in health care related to diabetes. “In every six seconds, a person dies due to diabetes-related diseases across the world. In almost every 70 seconds, a leg needs to be amputated because of diabetic imbalance. This figure is disturbing as it is at an increasing rate since last five years,” he said.

Explaining that poor lifestyle, irregular eating habits and lack of physical work is the cause of disease, Dr Jhulka said that owing to this, there is a decrease in the average age of patients. “We used to see patients in the age group of 25-40 being diagnosed with type-two diabetes. Now it is pretty common to see patients aged 10-16 years,” he said.

Referring to a data from a survey conducted on 1,100 daily wage workers in Khajrana and Nanda Nagar areas of the city, Dr Jhulka said that five percent of the workers were not aware that they had diabetes, while four percent of the respondents were already in a pre-diabetic stage, a stage before diabetes when blood sugar is abnormally high.