Band-baaja may go out of wedding marches | jaipur | Hindustan Times
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Band-baaja may go out of wedding marches

Wedding processions in Jaipur might soon lose their sheen. The civic authorities are planning to ban dancing and singing at wedding processions for a specific period of time every day to ease traffic jams.

jaipur Updated: Dec 19, 2007 10:15 IST

Wedding processions here might soon lose their sheen. The civic authorities are planning to ban dancing and singing at wedding processions for a specific period of time every day to ease traffic congestions.

The Jaipur Municipal Corporation (JMC) is drafting by-laws to ban orchestras, which are integral to Rajasthani - and indeed most north Indian - weddings.

"We have proposed a ban on bands and orchestras on the main roads in the city. We will soon come out with by-laws for the ban," Prabhatilal Sharma, chairman of JMC's by-laws committee, told IANS.

The civic body is preparing by-laws keeping in mind traffic congestions caused by the music bands. It feels that a marriage procession with a music band holds up traffic because people keep dancing on the streets for hours.

"Common people suffer because of the traffic congestion caused by these bands. The traffic department had recommended that the JMC impose curbs on wedding bands. We hope to have a law by the end of January next year," he said.

The civic body is consulting the traffic department to find out the hours when traffic clogs the arterial roads in the walled city.

"The walled city and some other parts are under severe traffic pressure from 9 am to 11 am and from 7 pm to 10 pm," he said. The bands would be banned during this period.

Music band owners, however, are not enthusiastic. "How can the civic body snatch our only source of livelihood from us? Most of the wedding processions hit the streets between 7 pm and 10 pm. Our business is dependant on the marriage processions. If it is banned, we will take to the streets in protest," Sharvan Lal, a music band owner, said.

Some residents think differently. "I have been caught in traffic snarls several times because marriage processions move slowly. I support the ban," said Vivek Kumar, a resident of the walled city.

And there are those who have a different take on the issue.

"A marriage is a 'once in a lifetime' event. People should have full freedom to enjoy it. I don't think there should be any prohibition on bands in marriage processions," local resident Ashok Mantri said.