Schools integrate to increase enrolment, students sit under open sky | jaipur | Hindustan Times
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Schools integrate to increase enrolment, students sit under open sky

The state government has integrated thousands of primary and upper primary schools to increase enrolment number and counter shortage of teachers, but the move brought thousands of students under open sky due to lack of adequate numbers of classrooms

jaipur Updated: Jul 14, 2016 21:11 IST
Mukesh Mathrani
Students study under a tree at a Barmer school.
Students study under a tree at a Barmer school. (HT Photo)

The state government has integrated thousands of primary and upper primary schools to increase enrolment number and counter shortage of teachers, but the move brought thousands of students under open sky due to lack of adequate numbers of classrooms.

Earlier, secondary schools have facility of rooms for students of Classes 6 to 12. After the integration of primary and upper primary schools in secondary school, it is accommodating students of Classes 1 to 12. But absence of adequate classrooms has forced thousands of students of Classes 1 to 5 to study under open sky.

Heerlal Khatri, the principal at government senior secondary school Bandra in Barmer, said they were forced to teach students under open sky due to non-unavailability of adequate classroom.

Gordhanlal Suthar, Barmer district education officer, said: “Considering the problem, we have started working on alternate option. We have advised the principals to send proposals through ‘School Development and Management Committee’ so that we will allow them to continue at the previous building.”

“We are also expecting for the allotment of budget after which required class rooms will be constructed,” he added.”

Onset of monsoon in the state has left parents and schools authorities, where students are studying under open sky, worried. However, the integration has positive sides as enrolment number has increased up to six percent while vacancies for teachers have reduced from 60 per cent to 33 per cent.