Album sings left feat tune to woo voters | kolkata | Hindustan Times
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Album sings left feat tune to woo voters

When Rupankar sang Haru Mandal for the newly launched pro-Left album Laal Nishan, he was reminded of Suman Chattopadhyay and his 1992 album Tomake Chai. HT reports

kolkata Updated: Apr 14, 2011 14:29 IST
HT Correspondent

When Rupankar sang Haru Mandal for the newly launched pro-Left album Laal Nishan, he was reminded of Suman Chattopadhyay and his 1992 album Tomake Chai. The story is of a rickshawpuller, Haru Mandal, who is poor, helpless but finds redemption through the Left Front Government.

"The track is peppy and faster than the typical ganasangeet that one identifies with Leftists. But the song sings of the glory and the achievements of the Left Front," Rupankar told HT.

The nine songs sung by Rupankar and Dibyendu Mukherjee among others were released by a group of Leftist artists such as Arindam Sil, Badshah Moitra, Paran Bandyopadhay, Wasim Kapoor on Wednesday. The cultural group that launched the album is christened Tuneer, headed by actor Sabyasachi Chakraborty.

Interestingly though, the intellectuals did not miss out on the opportunity to lash out at Mamata Banerjee and Trinamool Congress. "Laal Nishan means the red flag. We want to talk about the good things that the Left Front government has done, especially at a time when the rightist forces are tying up with the Ultra leftists," said Sharan Dutta, who wrote some of the lyrics.

The tracks are fast and, to impress the young voters, heavily depend on rock, punk, blues and jazz tunes. Said Arindam Sil, actor-turned-producer, "We have been hearing about the word change. But we believe that Mamata Banerjee is not a viable alternative to the Left Front. She can only usher in terror and bad governance."

Sil did not spare Trinamool candidate from Dum Dum Bratya Basu. "What objections can he have to being called natyakarmi? We are proud to be called natyakarmis. That's our culture."