Author Amit Chaudhuri says he did not know Kolkata teen who died at party

  • Hindustan Times, Kolkata
  • Updated: Jul 26, 2016 17:17 IST
The family never knew the teenage boy who was found in the basement, author Amit Chaudhuri said. (Picture courtesy: Screengrab)

The family never knew the boy, neither they were aware of alcohol being served to the friends of their daughter who had gathered at the parking lot of the posh Sunny Towers apartment, author Amit Chaudhuri said in a statement. When informed of the mishap, Chaudhuri rushed the victim Aabesh Dasgupta to the hospital.

“We tried to help a young man none of us knew and feel distressed not to have succeeded in doing this,” the statement read.

The author also claimed that he was not aware about alcohol made available to the youngsters.

Chaudhuri is a prominent contemporary Indian author in English. In 2002 he won the Sahitya Akademi award.

“Firstly, the gathering, meant to celebrate my daughter’s eighteenth birthday, had not been organised by us, but by two of her school friends, and was completely unknown to my daughter until she returned home on Saturday at 12.30pm after her tuition,” Chaudhuri wrote.

“It was a surprise, and our only condition was that, given the circumstances of mourning for her much-loved grandmother, we would prefer it if they had lunch outside,” he further added.

The statement read that Aabesh was not known to the birthday girl, and was not invited by the two friends who had organised the get-together. Aabesh had come with one of the other five boys in the group.

“There was never any alcohol made available to anyone anywhere in our flat; my wife and I are anyway teetotallers. Almost everyone returned to the building at around 4.30 pm after lunch,” the statement read.

The author was informed by his driver at around 6.10 pm about the bleeding boy in the basement.

“When I arrived on the scene, I found that two in the group were attending to the boy in the garage. Others were trying to call an ambulance. They had also tried to hail a yellow cab to take him to a hospital, but the cab hadn’t stopped. There were plenty of onlookers from the building, but no one except these young people were doing anything at all to help,” Chaudhuri wrote.

The author stated that he initially tried to get details of the boy’s parents but failed and the friend who brought in the victim had disappeared.

“I called an ambulance immediately and then decided not to wait. I put him in my car with the two young people who had been trying to help and told my driver to take him to the emergency ward of a nearby hospital. I followed in another car with my wife and daughter, but reached emergency first,” wrote Chaudhuri.

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