CISCE denies allegation of tinkering with marks | kolkata | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
May 29, 2017-Monday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

CISCE denies allegation of tinkering with marks

The Council for the Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) has denied allegations of tinkering with the marks of the two lakh ISC and ICSE students to 'improve' overall performance.

kolkata Updated: Jun 07, 2013 01:47 IST
HT Correspondent

The Council for the Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE) has denied allegations of tinkering with the marks of the two lakh ISC and ICSE students to 'improve' overall performance.

The board has pointed out that it is impossible for anyone to break into the website and download the result of the entire country.

On Thursday the news of Debarghya Das, the computer science student of Cornell University breaking into the councils website on May 17, the day ICSE and ISC results were published had hit the headlines.

Das accused the council of improving scores of students. Debarghya is currently interning with Google USA. He passed his ISC exam from La Martiniere for Boys, Kolkata, in 2011.

CISCE chief executive and secretary Jerry Arathoon said, "The board examination results are tabulated in offline mode on internal standalone servers...so there is no scope of anyone getting into the system as the server is not connected over the internet."

Debarghya however claimed that he downloaded the ICSE and ISC results of the entire country minutes after it was made available on the council website.

"I don't want to see the CISCE crash and burn or anything like that. I just want to point out an issue, and hope the authorities can rectify the same," Debarghya said.

Claiming that the data downloaded by him was genuine and his data analysis on tinkering with marks is correct he added, "Questions have been raised, and I'm eager to see what the answers are."

The council however has decided to downplay Debarghya’s claim. "IT enthusiasts have of late become aggressive in their endeavours to come into the limelight by resorting to unethical means including accessing and prying on data which is an unethical practice. The council has been targeted in this instance and we would be looking into the matter further in the best interest of all concerned," Arathoon said.

Speaking on Debarghya’s finding on how the council inflated the scores of the students to better overall performance Arathoon said, "In keeping with the practice followed by examination conducting bodies, a process of standardisation is applied to the results, so as to take into account the variations in difficulty level of questions over the years, as well as the marginal variations in evaluation of answer scripts by hundreds of examiners, for each subject."