IPS officer book publisher to move rights body | kolkata | Hindustan Times
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IPS officer book publisher to move rights body

Mitra and Ghosh publishers, who alleged police high handedness over IPS officer Nazrul Islam's book Musalmander Karaniyo (What Muslims Should Do), said on Wednesday that they would approach the State Human Rights Commission (SHRC) complaining against the police.

kolkata Updated: Sep 06, 2012 13:20 IST
HT Correspondent

Mitra and Ghosh publishers, who alleged police high handedness over IPS officer Nazrul Islam's book Musalmander Karaniyo (What Muslims Should Do), said on Wednesday that they would approach the State Human Rights Commission (SHRC) complaining against the police.

"I'm an 80-year-old cancer patient and also suffer from other health problems. But police woke me up at 11pm on August 30 asking for a copy of the book immediately. The next day they raided our shop and kept our counter closed for three hours, forcing loss of business. Is it not violation of human rights?" Sabitendranath Roy, owner of the eight-decades-old publishing house, said.

Roy had organised a media conference at Kolkata Press Club on Wednesday to talk about the harassment. However, he also said that internal politics of the publishing industry might have also played a role.

Their decision to move the SHRC may take interesting course, as the SHRC has recently had a series of spat with the state government.

Chief minister Mamata Banerjee vehemently attacked SHRC immediately after the commission recommended that the state government pay Rs. 50,000 as fine to Jadavpur University professor Ambikesh Mahapatra and his neighbour each for the harassment they faced after e-mailing a spoof on Banerjee and railway minister Mukul Roy.

Caring least about the chief minister's outburst against the commissions activities "beyond jurisdiction", the SHRC, on Tuesday, took suo motu cognizance on the murder of doctor in Barasat and asked IG, south Bengal, to submit a report within four weeks after personally inquiring into it.

Meanwhile, sales of the controversial book shot up since the raid at their office and all the 1,100 copies of the first edition were sold out by Wednesday.

"We sold 240 copies on Monday, which was more than 40% rise in sales. Tuesday and Wednesday witnessed similar sales," Indrani Roy Mitra of the publishing house said.

"We are going for the second edition now and the books will be available soon," she said.