Why is Mamata silent on govt's scams, asks Advani | kolkata | Hindustan Times
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Why is Mamata silent on govt's scams, asks Advani

West Bengal chief minister Mamata Banerjee likes to call a spade a spade but she is mysteriously quiet about the numerous scams that has hit the Congress at the Centre, BJP senior leader L K Advani remarked on Thursday. HT reports.

kolkata Updated: Oct 21, 2011 00:25 IST
HT Correspondent

West Bengal chief minister Mamata Banerjee likes to call a spade a spade but she is mysteriously quiet about the numerous scams that has hit the Congress at the Centre, BJP senior leader L K Advani remarked on Thursday.

"I know Mamata for years. She has always been outspoken. She has also criticised us in the past. But these days I have noticed she is not saying anything about the central government," said Advani while speaking at a rally in Kolkata. The senior BJP leader is currently on a 40-day anti-corruption yatra.

Advani's comments came as a surprise, especially since Banerjee's victory in the assembly polls, the BJP has given her some elbow room. In fact, in September, the party did not field any candidate for the assembly bypolls in Bhawanipore where Banerjee was elected as well as in Basirhat North.

Advani also said he had been told that there was no sign of 'parivartan' or change since the change of guard. He said he was particularly surprised at the lack of visible change despite the two allies (Congress and Trinamool Congress) ruling at the Centre and the state.

"The UPA government has got no legitimacy," he said, lashing out at the Centre.

Advani also said someone should point out the mistakes and wrongdoings of the central government.

"If I use strong words, the prime minister points out that I am using harsh words. In a democracy, the prime minister should have the last word. But everyone knows unless there is a clearance from 10 Janpath, nothing will move," said Advani, taking a dig at the prime minister, who was on his way back from South Africa.