Durjoy Datta is only 28 years old and is already considered one of the best-selling authors in the country. However, Datta doesn't stop at just writing books. He has also written the scripts of two television shows, Sadda Haq and Veera, which are successfully running on Indian television. Dutta, who was in Kolkata to launch his 11th novel, World's Best Boyfriend, spoke to us on his new book, his style of writing and more.

    This is your 11th novel. Why did you choose this title? 
    (Laughs). The story was about a couple, who should not be together but are together. I was constantly confused between world's worst boyfriend and world's best boyfriend because it could have been both ways. I had initially titled it World's Worst Boyfriend but someone in the editorial pointed out that it would have been too negative. So, I said let's give a title that has both the words. Later, I replaced worst with best, to make it sound more dramatic (smiles).

    You have been consistently coming up with novels since your first book. Is there a constant pressure of coming up with new ideas that will strike a chord with the readers?
    (Pauses). There's a pressure to tell a new story every time. There's no pressure as such when it comes to connecting with people. But then it's important for me to write a book that is not a reflection of my earlier books. That's something, which I had done for my first three books as I was getting into a comfort zone. My stories revolved around the lives of the same people. People still keep asking me when the next Deb and Avantika book will come out. I can write three more books about them but it's not going to be new to me. I am glad that I moved out of my comfort zone.

    What's special about your latest book?
    I have always portrayed all the characters in my earlier works as extraordinarily good looking. I wanted to move away from that. A lot of writers, including me have made this mistake of describing a person by how they look and what they are. I wanted to make that conscious change of not judging people by their looks. I have been at the receiving end and I have had some really mean nicknames as I used to be the heaviest and darkest in my class. I wanted to change that approach through this book.

    You were a good student and were studying engineering. What made you choose writing as a profession?
    (Cuts in) I started writing a blog in 2006. I used to bully a lot of people into reading my works and they eventually started liking it. Then, they started asking me to give writing books a serious thought. Initially, I never felt that my works would get published because during those days getting a publisher meant you had to be one of 'these writers' (Laughs out loud). Eventually, my book was published and I was very happy. However, I never stopped being a nerd. I was always into engineering and clearing entrance exams. I knew I had to get a job. It was only after I was sure that I didn't want to pursue a career in engineering, did I think of taking up writing as a full-time profession.

    You have been writing for about eight years now. Do you think one has to reach a certain age before being recognised as a good writer?
    Oh my god, eight years (laughs)? I don't think there is any age to be a good writer but I think my work got published way early. All the good writers get published in their thirties. In my case, I am writing as well as reading all the time, which means I do not have the requisite training to churn out books that are as good as the other 30-year-old writers, who are probably writing their first book now. So, in that sense, I am behind them. Every time I see a new writer, I check out their age first and when did they write their first book? (Breaks into a laugh)

    How do you react to criticism when it comes to your style of writing?
    I really don't count those remarks where I am portrayed as a person who writes grammatically incorrect English because I don't. The only thing that I feel writers like us lack is delivering a particular message in those many words. As a writer, I feel I lack the ability to portray an emotion in less than two sentences. So, I take a paragraph to convey it.

    Given that your books are doing well, was there a need to write for television?
    People kept telling me that I was writing my books too fast and I should slow down. (laughs out loud) Just kidding! There were a lot of people who wanted me to write for television. I could relate to the stories and thought of giving it a try.

    Any Bollywood projects up your sleeve?
    Bollywood is a very slow industry! It's not slow because the producers are slow. It's slow because of the writers.

    What next?
    My next book is again a love story (smiles). I am yet to come up with a title.

Turkish village becomes haven for Mayan doomsayers

  • AFP, Ankara
  • |
  • Updated: Dec 12, 2012 00:44 IST

Believers of the Mayan calendar prediction that the world will end on December 21 have flooded into a small village in western Turkey, near the ancient Greek city of Ephesus.

Some New Age spiritualists are convinced of a December 21 "doomsday" foretold by Mayan hieroglyphs -- at least according to some interpretations.

Sirince, a village of around 600 inhabitants, has a positive energy according to the doomsday cultists, who say that it is close to an area where Christians believe the Virgin Mary ascended to heaven.

The Mayan prophecy has sparked a tourism boom in the village, which is now expected to host more than 60,000 visitors according to local media.

"It is the first time we witness such an interest during the winter season," said Ilkan Gulgun, one of the hotel owners in Sirince, quoted by the media.

He said the tourists at his hotel believed that the positive energy of Sirince would save them from an apocalyptical catastrophe.

An ancient Greek village, Sirince is home to boutique hotels attracting Turkey's wealthy class. It is also well known for its wine.

Erkan Onoglu, a Turkish businessman, produced a special "wine of the Apocalypse" for December 21, a product on sale especially for superstitious survivalists, the daily Radikal newspaper reported.  

A resident of Sirince working in the hotel business, Ibrahim Katan, welcomed the enthusiasm of tourists to the village, hoping that local businesses can benefit from the boom.

"The rumours floating around have increased the number of customers. We are only happy about it," he told AFP.

 

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