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HindustanTimes Fri,01 Aug 2014

Diabetes? silent attack

PTI   May 21, 2003
First Published: 01:27 IST(24/4/2003) | Last Updated: 15:16 IST(21/5/2003)

Second Opinion / Dr Yatish Agarwal

My 62-year-old mother is a diabetic and has been on insulin for years. On a routine urine examination a few days ago, she was found to have 4-5 pus cells per high power field.

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A urine culture was done, which has demonstrated E. coli bacteria in a count of 100,000. The doctor gave her antibiotics for one week, but the picture has not changed. He feels that she may need prolonged antibiotic therapy, but my mother says she has no urinary symptoms. Please advise.

D.K. Jain

Dr A.K. Jhingan, diabetologist, Delhi Diabetes Research Centre, says My 62-year-old mother is a diabetic and has been on insulin for years. On a routine urine examination a few days ago, she was found to have 4-5 pus cells per high power field.

A urine culture was done, which has demonstrated E. coli bacteria in a count of 100,000. The doctor gave her antibiotics for one week, but the picture has not changed. He feels that she may need prolonged antibiotic therapy, but my mother says she has no urinary symptoms. Please advise.

D.K. Jain

Dr A.K. Jhingan, diabetologist, Delhi Diabetes Research Centre, says diabetes dampens the body’s immune surveillance system and makes a person vulnerable to many possible infections. It is notorious for causing urinary tract infections — both of the kidneys and the urinary bladder — and can be absolutely silent, but needs to be treated with care. Your mother may require 2-3 weeks of antibiotic therapy before she makes good her recovery. Lack of treatment is fraught with risk of lasting damage to the kidneys. She must also exercise good control over her blood sugar; that would be crucial for eliminating the infection.

Hydrocoele surgery

I am a 23-year-old male suffering from a left-sided hydrocoele. My surgeon has recommended surgery. Would the surgery stand in my way to medical fitness for a job in the government? Please clarify.

Gautam

Dr Avneet Singh Chawla, surgical specialist, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital, says your fear is unfounded. A history of surgery for correction of hydrocoele does not debar a person from a government job. Rather, if you were not to get the surgery done, you would be declared temporarily unfit because of the hydrocoele. The only treatment option is surgery. The procedure is simple and can be done as an outpatient. Conversely, a deferred surgery carries a risk of injury and infection.

Bravo, Down’s Child!

My 15-year-old son has had delayed milestones. His motor and speech development was late. He has a speech disorder, is unable to cope with academics and has been diagnosed to be a borderline Down’s child. We live in a small place, which does not have special schools, and therefore, I took a job as a teacher to ensure that he gets extra care at school. Now he is self-dependent in all respects except his studies. The problem is that my husband now wants to give him extra coaching so that he can sit for class 10 exams. I disagree, because I know my son cannot cope. Would it be fair for us to pressurise him?

Ritu Sharma

Well done! We at HT health, including the psychiatrist on our team, Dr Smita N. Deshpande, are all filled with admiration at the way you have handled your child’s disability. Very few parents have the time, patience, understanding and commitment to help their child do well in these circumstances. Your achievement is outstanding, considering that you had such little help.

Given the opportunity and an optimum environment, these children often surpass expectation. Now that your son has learnt some things, it might be useful for him to face more challenges, and this may include SSC exams. It is important, however, that you do not force him or ridicule his failures. If he feels up to it, you could help him try. He could sit for examination for one subject at a time from an open school. This would qualify him for vocational courses at various polytechnics and may later help him earn his living. It may also be worthwhile to get him tested intellectually to check how much he can actually do. We feel sure that he will succeed far beyond your dreams.

 It is notorious for causing urinary tract infections — both of the kidneys and the urinary bladder — and can be absolutely silent, but needs to be treated with care. Your mother may require 2-3 weeks of antibiotic therapy before she makes good her recovery. Lack of treatment is fraught with risk of lasting damage to the kidneys. She must also exercise good control over her blood sugar; that would be crucial for eliminating the infection.

Hydrocoele surgery

I am a 23-year-old male suffering from a left-sided hydrocoele. My surgeon has recommended surgery. Would the surgery stand in my way to medical fitness for a job in the government? Please clarify.

Gautam

Dr Avneet Singh Chawla, surgical specialist, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjung Hospital, says your fear is unfounded. A history of surgery for correction of hydrocoele does not debar a person from a government job. Rather, if you were not to get the surgery done, you would be declared temporarily unfit because of the hydrocoele. The only treatment option is surgery. The procedure is simple and can be done as an outpatient. Conversely, a deferred surgery carries a risk of injury and infection.

Bravo, Down’s Child!

My 15-year-old son has had delayed milestones. His motor and speech development was late. He has a speech disorder, is unable to cope with academics and has been diagnosed to be a borderline Down’s child. We live in a small place, which does not have special schools, and therefore, I took a job as a teacher to ensure that he gets extra care at school. Now he is self-dependent in all respects except his studies. The problem is that my husband now wants to give him extra coaching so that he can sit for class 10 exams. I disagree, because I know my son cannot cope. Would it be fair for us to pressurise him?

Ritu Sharma

Well done! We at HT health, including the psychiatrist on our team, Dr Smita N. Deshpande, are all filled with admiration at the way you have handled your child’s disability. Very few parents have the time, patience, understanding and commitment to help their child do well in these circumstances. Your achievement is outstanding, considering that you had such little help.

Given the opportunity and an optimum environment, these children often surpass expectation. Now that your son has learnt some things, it might be useful for him to face more challenges, and this may include SSC exams. It is important, however, that you do not force him or ridicule his failures. If he feels up to it, you could help him try. He could sit for examination for one subject at a time from an open school. This would qualify him for vocational courses at various polytechnics and may later help him earn his living. It may also be worthwhile to get him tested intellectually to check how much he can actually do. We feel sure that he will succeed far beyond your dreams.


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