A 10-yr-long tale of shocking isolation | lucknow | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 13, 2017-Wednesday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

A 10-yr-long tale of shocking isolation

Saturday was something different for the neighbours staying near an old house in sector A of Indira Nagar. Not accustomed to witness any activity here for the past several years, they saw the ‘powerless’ house come to life with visitors, onlookers, police and mediapersons gathered at the venue to meet the three siblings who have been living an isolated life since their parents died.

lucknow Updated: Aug 26, 2012 13:27 IST
HT Correspondent

Saturday was something different for the neighbours staying near an old house in sector A of Indira Nagar. Not accustomed to witness any activity here for the past several years, they saw the ‘powerless’ house come to life with visitors, onlookers, police and mediapersons gathered at the venue to meet the three siblings who have been living an isolated life since their parents died.

The owners of the house, Col Bhatt and his wife, died in an accident almost 10 years ago. And since then their children (all in their 30s and above now) Ranjana, Anjana and Babloo, have lived life under odd circumstances. No electricity, no water supply and no decent lifestyle, having no visitors to the home and with no near and dear ones to push life back on track for them.

Everything seems to have come to a standstill here. After the reports came in newspapers and TV channels about the siblings’ isolation, several NGOs have volunteered to help them overcome the shock. The trio has distanced themselves from the society and lives in isolation. “There is no one we can rely on. Aunty is slightly better but I hate uncle,” says Anjana, the younger daughter (approximately in 30s), who still appears to be in state of shock.

The elder Ranjana, though in sound mental state, too chose to confine her life within the four walls of the house. A postgraduate and fluent in English, she said, “We don’t need any help. We get our father’s pension which is enough to manage the living.”

The neighbours said that they often tried to help the family and asked if they wanted the electricity connection and other assistance. But the family refuses each time.

Only Anjana can be seen moving on the streets sometimes and asking for food and money from people. “She often knocks my gate late at night and asks for food. We give her whatever she needs-clothes, money, food,” said a woman in the neighbourhood.

Even while the family refuses to speak out as to why they chose such a lifestyle, an unsaid fear seemed loud enough. “Why should they take our property? It is our property and we are its masters,” murmured Anjana during her conversations.

The reason may still be unknown but the mental trauma that the trio faced after losing their parents is still quite high on their minds. A conversation with the family proves they have had a good upbringing and all are well educated. But the circumstances have led the family on a different path.