A temple where upper castes bow to Dalits | lucknow | Hindustan Times
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A temple where upper castes bow to Dalits

Stories of socially marginalised people not being allowed into places of worship are common in India. In such a scenario, a Dalit family presiding over an Uttar Pradesh temple for ages is nothing short of exemplary.

lucknow Updated: Mar 25, 2010 11:16 IST

Stories of socially marginalised people not being allowed into places of worship are common in India. In such a scenario, a Dalit family presiding over an Uttar Pradesh temple for ages is nothing short of exemplary.

It's only Dalits who have been priests of the Kali Mata temple, dedicated to goddess Durga, in Lakhna town in Etawah, some 300 km from Lucknow, ever since the shrine came up around 200 years ago.

"Caste divisions and discrimination may not have given Dalits a place of respectability in society, but here as priests they are revered," Ram Dular Rajbhar, who owns a grocery store in the town, told IANS on phone.

"Be it Brahmins, Thakurs or people from any of the other higher castes, after coming inside the temple, all have to bow before the Dalit priests and touch their feet. For others it may be surprising, but it has become a custom for us," he added.

Situated along the banks of the Yamuna river, the temple is sought after by the residents of Lakhna town for holding marriages, 'mundan' (tonsure ceremony of Hindu children) or other rituals particularly performed by Brahmins or members of the upper caste.

"It's not just a temple. It's a place that is an example of social equality," said Umesh Dixit, who owns several garment shops in Lakhna town.

"People in Lakhna also approach the priests to name their babies as it is believed that names given by Dalit priests would bring good luck and prosperity to the children and their families," he added.

According to locals, there's a story behind the custom of Dalit priests. They say King Jaipal Singh, who got the temple constructed, made it mandatory that the priest of the temple would only be a Dalit.

"While the construction of the temple was under way, Jaipal Singh noticed a Dalit labourer, Chhotelal, was being assaulted by a group of upper caste people for touching the idol that was to be placed inside the temple," said another resident Ram Raksha Pandey, who owns an eating joint in Lakhna.

"Jaipalji soon intervened in the matter and said only Chhotelal and his family would be taking care of the temple after its construction. Since then, the practice has been alive," he added.

At present two brothers, Ashok Kumar, 43, and Akhilesh Kumar, 45, who are fourth generation descendants of Chhotelal are the priests at the temple.