Amar’s detractors happy over resignation | lucknow | Hindustan Times
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Amar’s detractors happy over resignation

Even though senior Samajwadi Party leader Amar Singh resignation from the post of general secretary and membership of Parliamentary Board has given a jolt to party, Singh’s detractors seem to be happy.

lucknow Updated: Jan 06, 2010 17:33 IST
M Hasan

Even though senior Samajwadi Party leader Amar Singh resignation from the post of general secretary and membership of Parliamentary Board has given a jolt to party, Singh’s detractors seem to be happy.

For Singh’s detractors, it could be freedom from “continued humiliation”, as one leader of eastern UP put it. “It was in making for a long time”, commented a senior leader on the condition of anonymity.

There was rampant feeling in the party that Singh’s resignation would not affect the party. But none of the leader whom Hindustan Times contacted spoke on record.

The detractors’ jubilation may be short-lived, as committee could persuade him to stay.

The list of Singh’s detractors is long. While few like Beni Verma, Raj Babbar (both Congress MPs), Mohd Azam Khan, Salim Sherwani, Shafiqur Rahman Barq raised banner of revolt and left the party, others kept quite. Senior leaders Janeshwar Mishra, Yadav’s brother Prof Ramgopal Yadav, Mohan Singh, Reoti Raman Singh and many others too were not pulling on well with him.

Beni Verma, once a close confident of Yadav, however dubbed the resignation as “blackmailing tactics and a drama”. Verma said if Amar Singh was sincere on the issue, he should quit Rajya Sabha membership, which will expire in November 2014.

Amar Singh and Azam Khan washed dirty linen in 2009 Lok Sabha elections in Rampur, that led to Khan’s dismissal. Raj Babbar revolted against “Dalal” culture in 2005.

Yadav and Amar came together at a time when both needed each other desperately in 1996. While Amar Singh wanted a strong political base in UP, Yadav wanted an English speaking person who could effectively introduce the party in corridors of powers in Delhi and also raise funds for the then fledgling organization.

“It was indeed a marriage of convenience,” commented a senior SP leader.

The SP leaders may not like him but after nearly 15 years of association both have virtually become inseparable. Over the years Amar turned out to be Yadav’s “Man Friday”. Former BJP leader Kalyan Singh had called him the “Chanakya of India politics”, as Singh always succeeded in outmaneuvering his detractors. Singh was instrumental in bringing Yadav-Kalyan together before 2009 general elections.

Amar Singh was elected to Rajya Sabha in November 1996. Since then he has been continuously representing the party in Upper House. Yadav, much to the discomfiture of senior leaders, looked to Singh for governmental and organizational matter. Amar Singh proved his worth when the party was out of power and badly needed funds to run the organisation.